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Open AccessArticle

Possible Link Between Arctic Sea Ice and January PM10 Concentrations in South Korea

1
Department of Atmospheric Science, Kongju National University, Gongju 32588, Korea
2
Division of Polar Climate Sciences, Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon 21990, Korea
3
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
4
Department of Environmental Engineering and Energy, Myongji University, Yongin 17058, Korea
5
Division of Global Environment Research, National Institute of Environmental Research, Incheon 22689, Korea
6
School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, UNIST, Ulsan 44919, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2019, 10(10), 619; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10100619
Received: 1 September 2019 / Revised: 30 September 2019 / Accepted: 11 October 2019 / Published: 14 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances of Air Pollution Studies in South Korea)
In this study, we investigated the possible teleconnection between PM10 concentrations in South Korea and Arctic Sea ice concentrations at inter-annual time scales using observed PM10 data from South Korea, NCEP R2 data, and NOAA Sea Ice Concentration (SIC) data from 2001 to 2018. From the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, we found that the first mode (TC1) was a large-scale mode for PM10 in South Korea and explained about 27.4% of the total variability. Interestingly, the TC1 is more dominantly influenced by the horizontal ventilation effect than the vertical atmospheric stability effect. The pollution potential index (PPI), which is defined by the weighted average of the two ventilation effects, is highly correlated with the TC1 of PM10 at a correlation coefficient of 0.75, indicating that the PPI is a good measure for PM10 in South Korea at inter-annual time scales. Regression maps show that the decrease of SIC over the Barents Sea is significantly correlated with weakening of high pressure over the Ural mountain range region, the anomalous high pressure at 500 hPa over the Korean peninsula, and the weakening of the Siberian High and Aleutian low. Moreover, these patterns are similar to the correlation pattern with the PPI, suggesting that the variability of SIC over the Barents Sea may play an important role in modulating the variability of PM10 in South Korea through teleconnection from the Barents Sea to the Korean peninsula via Eurasia. View Full-Text
Keywords: PM10; Artic sea ice; ventilation effect; pollution potential index; Barents Sea; Siberian high; Aleutian low; teleconnection; Korea PM10; Artic sea ice; ventilation effect; pollution potential index; Barents Sea; Siberian high; Aleutian low; teleconnection; Korea
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Kim, J.-H.; Kim, M.-K.; Ho, C.-H.; Park, R.J.; Kim, M.J.; Lim, J.; Kim, S.-J.; Song, C.-K. Possible Link Between Arctic Sea Ice and January PM10 Concentrations in South Korea. Atmosphere 2019, 10, 619.

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