Next Article in Journal
Inter-Annual Variability of Boreal Summer Intra-Seasonal Oscillation Propagation from the Indian Ocean to the Western Pacific
Previous Article in Journal
Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Optical Properties in the Northeast Brazilian Atmosphere with Remote Sensing Data from MODIS and CALIOP/CALIPSO Satellites, AERONET Photometers and a Ground-Based Lidar
Previous Article in Special Issue
Spatial Distribution, Chemical Speciation and Health Risk of Heavy Metals from Settled Dust in Qingdao Urban Area
Open AccessArticle

Seasonal Variability in the Composition of Particulate Matter and the Microclimate in Cultural Heritage Areas

1
Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Valahia University of Targoviste, 130004 Targoviste, Romania
2
Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Science and Technology, Valahia University of Targoviste, 130004 Targoviste, Romania
3
Faculty of Materials Engineering and Mechanics, Valahia University of Targoviste, 130004 Targoviste, Romania
4
National Institute of Research and Development for Chemistry and Petrochemistry—ICECHIM, 060021 Bucharest, Romania
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2019, 10(10), 595; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10100595
Received: 29 August 2019 / Revised: 23 September 2019 / Accepted: 30 September 2019 / Published: 2 October 2019
This study is the first attempt to decipher the effect of particulate matter (PM) composition on people’s health and on historic sites, in correlation with the daily and seasonal microclimate monitoring of the indoor and outdoor areas of the Roman Mosaic Edifice museum (the maritime port of Constanta, Romania). More specifically, the increase of metal concentrations in particulate matter during the summer of 2018 and spring of 2019 in the museum under investigation could possibly be associated with the microclimates of both seasons, with coastal factors, as well as with the anthropic activities specific to the port of Constanta. FTIR and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) techniques, used for the investigation of PM2.5–10 samples, revealed high concentrations of Fe, Al-rich, and soluble particles inside the investigated museum area. In this respect, the chemical measurements of the PM2.5–10 masses highlighted high concentrations of heavy metals (i.e., Al, Fe, Zn, Mn, and Pb) and low concentrations of trace metals (i.e., Cr, Ni, Cu, and Cd). Statistical analysis showed that the chemical compositions of the particulate matter in the indoor and outdoor areas of the Roman Mosaic Edifice were influenced by microclimatic conditions, mainly temperature and relative humidity (RH). A potential health risk for tourists is the thermal and humid conditions, alongside the toxic components of the particulate matter. This research seeks to provide solutions for improving the environmental conditions inside the Roman Mosaic Edifice and to offer useful suggestions concerning health promotion and the protection of museum exhibits against possible future deterioration. View Full-Text
Keywords: particulate matter; microclimate; museum; health promotion; FTIR; ICP-MS; statistical analysis particulate matter; microclimate; museum; health promotion; FTIR; ICP-MS; statistical analysis
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Radulescu, C.; Stihi, C.; Ion, R.-M.; Dulama, I.-D.; Stanescu, S.-G.; Stirbescu, R.M.; Teodorescu, S.; Gurgu, I.-V.; Let, D.-D.; Olteanu, L.; Stirbescu, N.-M.; Bucurica, I.-A.; Olteanu, R.-L.; Nicolescu, C.-M. Seasonal Variability in the Composition of Particulate Matter and the Microclimate in Cultural Heritage Areas. Atmosphere 2019, 10, 595.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop