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Growth Trajectories in Genetic Subtypes of Prader–Willi Syndrome
Open AccessArticle

The Gut Microbiota Profile in Children with Prader–Willi Syndrome

1
HKU-Pasteur Research Pole, School of Public Health, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong 999077, China
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R3, Canada
3
Department of Agricultural Food & Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R3, Canada
4
Biostatistics & Epidemiology Division, RTI International, Durham, DC 27709, USA
5
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R3, Canada
6
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R3, Canada
7
APC Microbiome Ireland, School of Microbiology, and Department of Medicine, University College Cork–National University of Ireland, T12 YN60 Cork, Ireland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Genes 2020, 11(8), 904; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11080904
Received: 18 July 2020 / Revised: 4 August 2020 / Accepted: 5 August 2020 / Published: 7 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetics of Prader-Willi syndrome)
Although gut microbiota has been suggested to play a role in disease phenotypes of Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS), little is known about its composition in affected children and how it relates to hyperphagia. This cross-sectional study aimed to characterize the gut bacterial and fungal communities of children with PWS, and to determine associations with hyperphagia. Fecal samples were collected from 25 children with PWS and 25 age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched controls. Dietary intake data, hyperphagia scores, and relevant clinical information were also obtained. Fecal bacterial and fungal communities were characterized by 16S rRNA and ITS2 sequencing, respectively. Overall bacterial α-diversity and compositions of PWS were not different from those of the controls, but 13 bacterial genera were identified to be differentially abundant. Interestingly, the fungal community, as well as specific genera, were different between PWS and controls. The majority of the variation in the gut microbiota was not attributed to differences in dietary intake or the impact of genotype. Hyperphagia scores were associated with fungal α-diversity and relative abundance of several taxa, such as Staphylococcus, Clostridium, SMB53, and Candida. Further longitudinal studies correlating changes in the microbiome with the degree of hyperphagia and studies integrating multi-omics data are warranted. View Full-Text
Keywords: Prader–Willi syndrome; gut microbiota; bacteria; fungi; diet; hyperphagia; obesity; cross-sectional Prader–Willi syndrome; gut microbiota; bacteria; fungi; diet; hyperphagia; obesity; cross-sectional
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Peng, Y.; Tan, Q.; Afhami, S.; Deehan, E.C.; Liang, S.; Gantz, M.; Triador, L.; Madsen, K.L.; Walter, J.; Tun, H.M.; Haqq, A.M. The Gut Microbiota Profile in Children with Prader–Willi Syndrome. Genes 2020, 11, 904.

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