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Review

Schwann Cell-Like Cells: Origin and Usability for Repair and Regeneration of the Peripheral and Central Nervous System

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Basel, Gewerbestrasse 14, 4123 Allschwil, Switzerland
2
Department of Biomedicine, University Hospital Basel, Hebelstrasse 20, 4031 Basel, Switzerland
3
Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, Aesthetic and Hand Surgery, University Hospital Basel, University of Basel, Spitalstrasse 21, 4031 Basel, Switzerland
4
Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Basel, Spitalstrasse 21, 4031 Basel, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cells 2020, 9(9), 1990; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9091990
Received: 8 June 2020 / Revised: 6 August 2020 / Accepted: 22 August 2020 / Published: 29 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Schwann Cells: From Formation to Clinical Significance)
Functional recovery after neurotmesis, a complete transection of the nerve fiber, is often poor and requires a surgical procedure. Especially for longer gaps (>3 mm), end-to-end suturing of the proximal to the distal part is not possible, thus requiring nerve graft implantation. Artificial nerve grafts, i.e., hollow fibers, hydrogels, chitosan, collagen conduits, and decellularized scaffolds hold promise provided that these structures are populated with Schwann cells (SC) that are widely accepted to promote peripheral and spinal cord regeneration. However, these cells must be collected from the healthy peripheral nerves, resulting in significant time delay for treatment and undesired morbidities for the donors. Therefore, there is a clear need to explore the viable source of cells with a regenerative potential similar to SC. For this, we analyzed the literature for the generation of Schwann cell-like cells (SCLC) from stem cells of different origins (i.e., mesenchymal stem cells, pluripotent stem cells, and genetically programmed somatic cells) and compared their biological performance to promote axonal regeneration. Thus, the present review accounts for current developments in the field of SCLC differentiation, their applications in peripheral and central nervous system injury, and provides insights for future strategies. View Full-Text
Keywords: Schwann cells; Schwann cell-like cells; human adipose stem cells; neurotrophic factors; peripheral nerve injuries; spinal injuries; brain injuries; axonal regeneration; myelin regeneration Schwann cells; Schwann cell-like cells; human adipose stem cells; neurotrophic factors; peripheral nerve injuries; spinal injuries; brain injuries; axonal regeneration; myelin regeneration
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hopf, A.; Schaefer, D.J.; Kalbermatten, D.F.; Guzman, R.; Madduri, S. Schwann Cell-Like Cells: Origin and Usability for Repair and Regeneration of the Peripheral and Central Nervous System. Cells 2020, 9, 1990. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9091990

AMA Style

Hopf A, Schaefer DJ, Kalbermatten DF, Guzman R, Madduri S. Schwann Cell-Like Cells: Origin and Usability for Repair and Regeneration of the Peripheral and Central Nervous System. Cells. 2020; 9(9):1990. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9091990

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hopf, Alois, Dirk J. Schaefer, Daniel F. Kalbermatten, Raphael Guzman, and Srinivas Madduri. 2020. "Schwann Cell-Like Cells: Origin and Usability for Repair and Regeneration of the Peripheral and Central Nervous System" Cells 9, no. 9: 1990. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9091990

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