Next Article in Journal
The Proteasomal Deubiquitinating Enzyme PSMD14 Regulates Macroautophagy by Controlling Golgi-to-ER Retrograde Transport
Previous Article in Journal
Pirfenidone Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Collagen I Production of Primary Human Intestinal Fibroblasts
Previous Article in Special Issue
Loading of Primary Human T Lymphocytes with Citrate-Coated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Does Not Impair Their Activation after Polyclonal Stimulation
Open AccessArticle

Graphene Oxide Nanosheets for Localized Hyperthermia—Physicochemical Characterization, Biocompatibility, and Induction of Tumor Cell Death

1
Department of Internal Medicine 3—Rheumatology and Immunology, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University (FAU) Erlangen-Nürnberg, 90154 Erlangen, Germany
2
Univ. Lille, CNRS, Centrale Lille Univ. Polytechnique Hauts-de-France, UMR 8520-IEMN, F-59000 Lille, France
3
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Section of Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (SEON), Else Kröner-Fresenius-Stiftung-Professorship, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, 91054 Erlangen, Germany
4
Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nürnberg, 90154 Erlangen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cells 2020, 9(3), 776; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030776 (registering DOI)
Received: 13 February 2020 / Revised: 17 March 2020 / Accepted: 20 March 2020 / Published: 23 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Interaction of Biomedical Nanoparticles with the Immune System)
Background: The main goals of cancer treatment are not only to eradicate the tumor itself but also to elicit a specific immune response that overcomes the resistance of tumor cells against chemo- and radiotherapies. Hyperthermia was demonstrated to chemo- and radio-sensitize cancerous cells. Many reports have confirmed the immunostimulatory effect of such multi-modal routines. Methods: We evaluated the interaction of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets; its derivatives reduced GO and PEGylated rGO, with components of peripheral blood and evaluated its thermal conductivity to induce cell death by localized hyperthermia. Results: We confirmed the sterility and biocompatibility of the graphene nanomaterials and demonstrated that hyperthermia applied alone or in the combination with radiotherapy induced much more cell death in tumor cells than irradiation alone. Cell death was confirmed by the release of lactate dehydrogenase from dead and dying tumor cells. Conclusion: Biocompatible GO and its derivatives can be successfully used in graphene-induced hyperthermia to elicit tumor cell death. View Full-Text
Keywords: graphene oxide; hyperthermia; radiotherapy; cell death; infrared; hemocompatibility graphene oxide; hyperthermia; radiotherapy; cell death; infrared; hemocompatibility
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Podolska, M.J.; Barras, A.; Alexiou, C.; Frey, B.; Gaipl, U.; Boukherroub, R.; Szunerits, S.; Janko, C.; Muñoz, L.E. Graphene Oxide Nanosheets for Localized Hyperthermia—Physicochemical Characterization, Biocompatibility, and Induction of Tumor Cell Death. Cells 2020, 9, 776.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop