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Spatiotemporal Control of Intracellular Membrane Trafficking by Rho GTPases
Open AccessFeature PaperReview

ER-to-Golgi Trafficking and Its Implication in Neurological Diseases

by Bo Wang 1,2,†, Katherine R. Stanford 1,2 and Mondira Kundu 1,2,*
1
Department of Pathology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA
2
Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Present address: School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102, China.
Cells 2020, 9(2), 408; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9020408
Received: 21 November 2019 / Revised: 27 January 2020 / Accepted: 7 February 2020 / Published: 11 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membrane Traffic in Health and Disease)
Membrane and secretory proteins are essential for almost every aspect of cellular function. These proteins are incorporated into ER-derived carriers and transported to the Golgi before being sorted for delivery to their final destination. Although ER-to-Golgi trafficking is highly conserved among eukaryotes, several layers of complexity have been added to meet the increased demands of complex cell types in metazoans. The specialized morphology of neurons and the necessity for precise spatiotemporal control over membrane and secretory protein localization and function make them particularly vulnerable to defects in trafficking. This review summarizes the general mechanisms involved in ER-to-Golgi trafficking and highlights mutations in genes affecting this process, which are associated with neurological diseases in humans.
Keywords: COPII trafficking; endoplasmic reticulum; Golgi apparatus; neurological disease COPII trafficking; endoplasmic reticulum; Golgi apparatus; neurological disease
MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, B.; Stanford, K.R.; Kundu, M. ER-to-Golgi Trafficking and Its Implication in Neurological Diseases. Cells 2020, 9, 408.

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