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FAIM: An Antagonist of Fas-Killing and Beyond

by Jianxin Huo 1, Shengli Xu 1,2 and Kong-Peng Lam 1,3,4,*
1
Bioprocessing Technology Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore 138668, Singapore
2
Department of Physiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117593, Singapore
3
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117545, Singapore
4
School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551, Singapore
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cells 2019, 8(6), 541; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8060541
Received: 15 May 2019 / Revised: 29 May 2019 / Accepted: 30 May 2019 / Published: 4 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Cell Signaling and Regulated Cell Death)
Fas Apoptosis Inhibitory Molecule (FAIM) is an anti-apoptotic protein that is up-regulated in B cell receptor (BCR)-activated B cells and confers upon them resistance to Fas-mediated cell death. Faim has two alternatively spliced isoforms, with the short isoform ubiquitously expressed in various tissues and the long isoform mainly found in the nervous tissues. FAIM is evolutionarily conserved but does not share any significant primary sequence homology with any known protein. The function of FAIM has been extensively studied in the past 20 years, with its primary role being ascribed to be anti-apoptotic. In addition, several other functions of FAIM were also discovered in different physiological and pathological conditions, such as cell growth, metabolism, Alzheimer’s disease and tumorigenesis. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying FAIM’s role in these conditions remain unknown. In this review, we summarize comprehensively the functions of FAIM in these different contexts and discuss its potential as a diagnostic, prognostic or therapeutic target. View Full-Text
Keywords: FAIM; B cells; Fas-mediated apoptosis; TCR-mediated apoptosis; metabolism; Alzheimer’s disease; Multiple myeloma; Akt; c-FLIP FAIM; B cells; Fas-mediated apoptosis; TCR-mediated apoptosis; metabolism; Alzheimer’s disease; Multiple myeloma; Akt; c-FLIP
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MDPI and ACS Style

Huo, J.; Xu, S.; Lam, K.-P. FAIM: An Antagonist of Fas-Killing and Beyond. Cells 2019, 8, 541.

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