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Cells 2019, 8(1), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8010068

Retinal Neuron Is More Sensitive to Blue Light-Induced Damage than Glia Cell Due to DNA Double-Strand Breaks

State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Received: 1 December 2018 / Revised: 6 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Organelle Function)
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Abstract

Blue light is a major component of visible light and digital displays. Over-exposure to blue light could cause retinal damage. However, the mechanism of its damage is not well defined. Here, we demonstrate that blue light (900 lux) impairs cell viability and induces cell apoptosis in retinal neurocytes in vitro. A DNA electrophoresis assay shows severe DNA damage in retinal neurocytes at 2 h after blue light treatment. γ-H2AX foci, a specific marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), is mainly located in the Map2-posotive neuron other than the glia cell. After assaying the expression level of proteins related to DNA repair, Mre11, Ligase IV and Ku80, we find that Ku80 is up-regulated in retinal neurocytes after blue light treatment. Interestingly, Ku80 is mainly expressed in glia fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive glia cells. Moreover, following blue light exposure in vivo, DNA DSBs are shown in the ganglion cell layer and only observed in Map2-positive cells. Furthermore, long-term blue light exposure significantly thinned the retina in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that blue light induces DNA DSBs in retinal neurons, and the damage is more pronounced compared to glia cells. Thus, this study provides new insights into the mechanisms of the effect of blue light on the retina. View Full-Text
Keywords: blue light; retinal neuron; glia cell; DNA double strand breaks blue light; retinal neuron; glia cell; DNA double strand breaks
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Chen, P.; Lai, Z.; Wu, Y.; Xu, L.; Cai, X.; Qiu, J.; Yang, P.; Yang, M.; Zhou, P.; Zhuang, J.; Ge, J.; Yu, K.; Zhuang, J. Retinal Neuron Is More Sensitive to Blue Light-Induced Damage than Glia Cell Due to DNA Double-Strand Breaks. Cells 2019, 8, 68.

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