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Contemporary Mouse Models in Glioma Research

1
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75235, USA
2
Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA
3
Department of Pathology, Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Texas Health San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 75229, USA
4
Children’s Medical Center Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
5
Harrold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75235, USA
6
Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75235, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Chun Zhang Yang
Cells 2021, 10(3), 712; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10030712
Received: 3 March 2021 / Revised: 20 March 2021 / Accepted: 20 March 2021 / Published: 23 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Basis of Brain Tumors)
Despite advances in understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of glioma, outcomes remain dismal. Developing successful treatments for glioma requires faithful in vivo disease modeling and rigorous preclinical testing. Murine models, including xenograft, syngeneic, and genetically engineered models, are used to study glioma-genesis, identify methods of tumor progression, and test novel treatment strategies. Since the discovery of highly recurrent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations in lower-grade gliomas, there is increasing emphasis on effective modeling of IDH mutant brain tumors. Improvements in preclinical models that capture the phenotypic and molecular heterogeneity of gliomas are critical for the development of effective new therapies. Herein, we explore the current status, advancements, and challenges with contemporary murine glioma models. View Full-Text
Keywords: glioma; genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM); isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH); patient-derived xenograft (PDX); mouse model glioma; genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM); isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH); patient-derived xenograft (PDX); mouse model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hicks, W.H.; Bird, C.E.; Traylor, J.I.; Shi, D.D.; El Ahmadieh, T.Y.; Richardson, T.E.; McBrayer, S.K.; Abdullah, K.G. Contemporary Mouse Models in Glioma Research. Cells 2021, 10, 712. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10030712

AMA Style

Hicks WH, Bird CE, Traylor JI, Shi DD, El Ahmadieh TY, Richardson TE, McBrayer SK, Abdullah KG. Contemporary Mouse Models in Glioma Research. Cells. 2021; 10(3):712. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10030712

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hicks, William H.; Bird, Cylaina E.; Traylor, Jeffrey I.; Shi, Diana D.; El Ahmadieh, Tarek Y.; Richardson, Timothy E.; McBrayer, Samuel K.; Abdullah, Kalil G. 2021. "Contemporary Mouse Models in Glioma Research" Cells 10, no. 3: 712. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10030712

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