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Deciphering the Genetic Architecture of Plant Virus Resistance by GWAS, State of the Art and Potential Advances

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INRAE, Génétique et Amélioration des Fruits et Légumes (GAFL), 84143 Montfavet, France
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Bayer Crop Science, Chemin de Roque Martine, 13670 Saint-Andiol, France
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INRAE, CNRS, AgroParisTech, Génétique Quantitative et Evolution—Le Moulon, Université Paris-Saclay, Ferme du Moulon, 91190 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
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Mathématiques et Informatique Appliquées (MIA)-Paris, INRAE, AgroParisTech, Université Paris-Saclay, 75231 Paris, France
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Université de Bordeaux, INRAE, BFP, UMR 1332, 33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ahmed Hadidi and Henryk Hanokh Czosnek
Cells 2021, 10(11), 3080; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10113080
Received: 1 October 2021 / Revised: 3 November 2021 / Accepted: 4 November 2021 / Published: 8 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Virus/Viroid-Vector Interactions)
Growing virus resistant varieties is a highly effective means to avoid yield loss due to infection by many types of virus. The challenge is to be able to detect resistance donors within plant species diversity and then quickly introduce alleles conferring resistance into elite genetic backgrounds. Until now, mainly monogenic forms of resistance with major effects have been introduced in crops. Polygenic resistance is harder to map and introduce in susceptible genetic backgrounds, but it is likely more durable. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) offer an opportunity to accelerate mapping of both monogenic and polygenic resistance, but have seldom been implemented and described in the plant–virus interaction context. Yet, all of the 48 plant–virus GWAS published so far have successfully mapped QTLs involved in plant virus resistance. In this review, we analyzed general and specific GWAS issues regarding plant virus resistance. We have identified and described several key steps throughout the GWAS pipeline, from diversity panel assembly to GWAS result analyses. Based on the 48 published articles, we analyzed the impact of each key step on the GWAS power and showcase several GWAS methods tailored to all types of viruses. View Full-Text
Keywords: plant; virus; GWAS plant; virus; GWAS
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MDPI and ACS Style

Monnot, S.; Desaint, H.; Mary-Huard, T.; Moreau, L.; Schurdi-Levraud, V.; Boissot, N. Deciphering the Genetic Architecture of Plant Virus Resistance by GWAS, State of the Art and Potential Advances. Cells 2021, 10, 3080. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10113080

AMA Style

Monnot S, Desaint H, Mary-Huard T, Moreau L, Schurdi-Levraud V, Boissot N. Deciphering the Genetic Architecture of Plant Virus Resistance by GWAS, State of the Art and Potential Advances. Cells. 2021; 10(11):3080. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10113080

Chicago/Turabian Style

Monnot, Severine, Henri Desaint, Tristan Mary-Huard, Laurence Moreau, Valerie Schurdi-Levraud, and Nathalie Boissot. 2021. "Deciphering the Genetic Architecture of Plant Virus Resistance by GWAS, State of the Art and Potential Advances" Cells 10, no. 11: 3080. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10113080

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