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Open AccessArticle

Valorization of Vineyard By-Products to Obtain Composted Digestate and Biochar Suitable for Nursery Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) Production

1
Department of Life Science, Centre BIOGEST-SITEIA, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Amendola, n. 2, 42122 Reggio Emilia (RE), Italy
2
Council for Agricultural Research and Economics-Research Centre for Animal Production and Aquaculture, Viale Piacenza, 29, 26900 Lodi, Italy
3
Department of Engineering ‘Enzo Ferrari’, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Vivarelli 101, 41125 Modena, Italy
4
Council for Agricultural Research and Economics-Research Centre for Vegetable and Ornamental Crops, Via Cavalleggeri, 25, 84098 Pontecagnano Faiano (SA), Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2019, 9(8), 420; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9080420
Received: 27 May 2019 / Revised: 19 July 2019 / Accepted: 22 July 2019 / Published: 1 August 2019
Although compost and biochar received high attention as growing media, little information is available on the potential of vineyard by-products for the production and use of composted solid digestate (CSD) and biochar (BC). In the present study, two experiments are reported on CSD and BC mixed with commercial peat (CP) for grapevine planting material production. Four doses (0, 10%, 20%, 40% vol.) of CSD and BC were assessed in the first and second experiment, respectively. CSD mixed at a dose of 10% recorded the highest values of shoot dry weight (SDW) and a fraction of total dry biomass allocated to shoot (FTS), both cropping bench-graft and bare-rooted vine. On the other hand, CSD mixed at a dose of 40% displayed the highest values of SDW and FTS, cropping two-year-old vine. BC used at a dose of 10% improved SDW, root dry weight, total dry weight, FTS, shoot diameter, and height on bare-rooted vine. The present study shows that CSD and BC, coming from the valorization of vineyard by-products, can be used in the production of innovative growing media suitable for nursery grapevine production. Further studies are needed to assess the combined applications of CSD and BC in the same growing media. View Full-Text
Keywords: vineyard by-products; composted solid digestate; biochar; grapevine planting material vineyard by-products; composted solid digestate; biochar; grapevine planting material
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Ronga, D.; Francia, E.; Allesina, G.; Pedrazzi, S.; Zaccardelli, M.; Pane, C.; Tava, A.; Bignami, C. Valorization of Vineyard By-Products to Obtain Composted Digestate and Biochar Suitable for Nursery Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) Production. Agronomy 2019, 9, 420.

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