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Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria Avoid Processing Tomato Leaf Damage during Chilling Stress

1
Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Amendola, n. 2, 42122 Reggio Emilia, Italy
2
Consiglio per la ricerca in agricoltura e l’analisi dell’economia agraria-Centro di ricerca Genomica e Bioinformatica (CREA-GB), Via San Protaso, 302, 29017 Fiorenzuola d′Arda, Italy
3
IRD, Cirad, Univ Montpellier, IPME, 911 Avenue Agropolis, 64501, 34394 Montpellier CEDEX 5, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Present address: Consiglio per la ricerca in agricoltura e l’analisi dell’economia agraria-Centro di ricerca per la Zootecnia ed acquacoltura (CREA-ZA), Viale Piacenza, 29, 26900 Lodi, Italy.
Agronomy 2019, 9(6), 299; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9060299
Received: 2 May 2019 / Revised: 1 June 2019 / Accepted: 9 June 2019 / Published: 10 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Horticultural and Floricultural Crops)
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Abstract

Chilling stress limits processing tomato growth and yield, leading to high losses. An approach to increase the sustainability of crop production could involve the use of beneficial microorganisms. The objectives of this research were to investigate: (i) the efficacy of Funneliformis mosseae and Paraburkholderia graminis C4D1M in avoiding processing tomato damage during severe chilling stress; (ii) the synergic effect of the two microorganisms inoculated as a consortium; (iii) if the putative microorganism effects depended on the processing tomato genotype. To achieve these objectives, two experiments were carried out. In the first experiment, a modern genotype was assessed, while three genotypes were evaluated in the second experiment. At sowing, F. mosseae was mixed with peat. Nine days after sowing, P. graminis was inoculated close to the plant’s root collar. After 40 days of seed sowing, chilling treatment was performed at 1 °C for 24 h. F. mosseae mainly reduced the cell membrane injuries in term of electrolytic leakage and efficiency of photosystem II, after the chilling stress in both experiments. Conversely, in the second experiment, the consortium improved the seedling regrowth, increasing the efficiency of photosystem II. In addition, modern genotypes inoculated with microorganisms showed a better seedling regrowth. View Full-Text
Keywords: chilling stress; processing tomato; seedlings; arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi; plant growth promoting rhizobacteria; microorganisms chilling stress; processing tomato; seedlings; arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi; plant growth promoting rhizobacteria; microorganisms
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Caradonia, F.; Francia, E.; Morcia, C.; Ghizzoni, R.; Moulin, L.; Terzi, V.; Ronga, D. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria Avoid Processing Tomato Leaf Damage during Chilling Stress. Agronomy 2019, 9, 299.

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