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Increasing Ascorbic Acid Content and Salinity Tolerance of Cherry Tomato Plants by Suppressed Expression of the Ascorbate Oxidase Gene

1
Vegetable Crops Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Giza 12613, Egypt
2
INRA, UR1052, Génétique et amélioration des fruits et légumes, Domaine St Maurice, Allée des Chênes, 84143 Montfavet, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2019, 9(2), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9020051
Received: 11 January 2019 / Revised: 22 January 2019 / Accepted: 23 January 2019 / Published: 26 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Horticultural and Floricultural Crops)
Ascorbic acid is considered to be one of the most important antioxidants in plants and plays a vital role in the adaptation of plants to unfavorable conditions. In the present study, an ascorbate oxidase gene (Solyc04g054690) was over-expressed in cherry tomato cv. West Virginia 106 lines and compared with previously studied RNAi silenced ascorbate oxidase lines. Two lines with lower ascorbate oxidase activity (AO−15 and AO−42), two lines with elevated activity (AO+14 and AO+16), and the non-transgenic line (WVa106) were grown and irrigated with 75 mM and 150 mM NaCl in 2015 and 2016. Growth, yield, and chemical composition of the lines under salinity stress were evaluated. Lines with lower ascorbate oxidase activity resulted in higher plant growth parameters (plant height, leaf number, flower, and cluster number in 2015 and stem diameter and flower number in 2016), and improved fruit quality (firmness in 2016 and soluble solid content in 2015) and total yield per plant under salinity stress over both years. In addition, we show that ascorbic acid, lycopene, and carotene contents of fruits were higher in lines with lower ascorbate oxidase activity compared to lines with elevated activity and the non-transgenic line under conditions of moderate and high salinity in both years. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin C; NaCl; salt; GMO; Solanum lycopersicum Mill vitamin C; NaCl; salt; GMO; Solanum lycopersicum Mill
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MDPI and ACS Style

F. Abdelgawad, K.; M. El-Mogy, M.; I. A. Mohamed, M.; Garchery, C.; G. Stevens, R. Increasing Ascorbic Acid Content and Salinity Tolerance of Cherry Tomato Plants by Suppressed Expression of the Ascorbate Oxidase Gene. Agronomy 2019, 9, 51. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9020051

AMA Style

F. Abdelgawad K, M. El-Mogy M, I. A. Mohamed M, Garchery C, G. Stevens R. Increasing Ascorbic Acid Content and Salinity Tolerance of Cherry Tomato Plants by Suppressed Expression of the Ascorbate Oxidase Gene. Agronomy. 2019; 9(2):51. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9020051

Chicago/Turabian Style

F. Abdelgawad, Karima, Mohamed M. El-Mogy, Mohamed I. A. Mohamed, Cecile Garchery, and Rebecca G. Stevens. 2019. "Increasing Ascorbic Acid Content and Salinity Tolerance of Cherry Tomato Plants by Suppressed Expression of the Ascorbate Oxidase Gene" Agronomy 9, no. 2: 51. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9020051

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