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Open AccessArticle

Long-Term Effects of Biochar-Based Organic Amendments on Soil Microbial Parameters

1
Department of geology and pedology, Faculty of Forestry and Wood technology, Mendel University in Brno, Brno 61300, Czech Republic
2
Department of Agrochemistry, Soil Science, Microbiology and Plant Nutrition, Faculty of AgriSciences, Mendel University in Brno, Brno 61300, Czech Republic
3
Agriculture Research, Ltd., Troubsko 66441, Czech Republic
4
Agrovyzkum Rapotin, Ltd., Rapotin 78813, Czech Republic
5
Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of AgriSciences, Mendel University in Brno, Brno 61300, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2019, 9(11), 747; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9110747
Received: 8 October 2019 / Revised: 30 October 2019 / Accepted: 9 November 2019 / Published: 12 November 2019
Biochar application to the soil has been recommended as a carbon (C) management approach to sequester C and improve soil quality. Three-year experiments were conducted to investigate the interactive effects of three types of amendments on microbial biomass carbon, soil dehydrogenase activity and soil microbial community abundance in luvisols of arable land in the Czech Republic. Four different treatments were studied, which were, only NPK as a control, NPK + cattle manure, NPK + biochar and NPK + combination of manure with biochar. The results demonstrate that all amendments were effective in increasing the fungal and bacterial biomass, as is evident from the increased values of bacterial and fungal phospholipid fatty acid analysis. The ammonia-oxidizing bacteria population increases with the application of biochar, and it reaches its maximum value when biochar is applied in combination with manure. The overall results suggest that co-application of biochar with manure changes soil properties in favor of increased microbial biomass. It was confirmed that the application of biochar might increase or decrease soil activity, but its addition, along with manure, always promotes microbial abundance and their activity. The obtained results can be used in the planning and execution of the biochar-based soil amendments. View Full-Text
Keywords: biomass; biochar; soil; BPLFA; FPLFA; DHA; ammonia-oxidizing bacteria biomass; biochar; soil; BPLFA; FPLFA; DHA; ammonia-oxidizing bacteria
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Brtnicky, M.; Dokulilova, T.; Holatko, J.; Pecina, V.; Kintl, A.; Latal, O.; Vyhnanek, T.; Prichystalova, J.; Datta, R. Long-Term Effects of Biochar-Based Organic Amendments on Soil Microbial Parameters. Agronomy 2019, 9, 747.

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