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Article

Organic Farming Lessens Reliance on Pesticides and Promotes Public Health by Lowering Dietary Risks

1
Heartland Health Research Alliance, Port Orchard, WA 98367, USA
2
Pesticide Research Institute, Santa Rosa, CA 95404, USA
3
Crop and Soil Science Department, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Carlo Leifert
Agronomy 2021, 11(7), 1266; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11071266
Received: 26 May 2021 / Revised: 10 June 2021 / Accepted: 13 June 2021 / Published: 22 June 2021
Organic agriculture is a production system that relies on prevention, ecological processes, biodiversity, mechanical processes, and natural cycles to control pests and maintain productivity. Pesticide use is generally limited or absent in organic agroecosystems, in contrast with non-organic (conventional) production systems that primarily rely on pesticides for crop protection. Significant differences in pesticide use between the two production systems markedly alter the relative dietary exposure and risk levels and the environmental impacts of pesticides. Data are presented on pesticide use on organic and non-organic farms for all crops and selected horticultural crops. The relative dietary risks that are posed by organic and non-organic food, with a focus on fresh produce, are also presented and compared. The results support the notion that organic farms apply pesticides far less intensively than conventional farms, in part because, over time on well-managed organic farms, pest pressure falls when compared to the levels on nearby conventional farms growing the same crops. Biopesticides are the predominant pesticides used in organic production, which work by a non-toxic mode of action, and pose minimal risks to human health and the environment. Consequently, eating organic food, especially fruits and vegetables, can largely eliminate the risks posed by pesticide dietary exposure. We recommend ways to lower the pesticide risks by increased adoption of organic farming practices and highlight options along organic food supply chains to further reduce pesticide use, exposures, and adverse worker and environmental impacts. View Full-Text
Keywords: organic farming; pesticides; public health; pesticide use; biopesticides; integrated pest management; food quality protection organic farming; pesticides; public health; pesticide use; biopesticides; integrated pest management; food quality protection
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MDPI and ACS Style

Benbrook, C.; Kegley, S.; Baker, B. Organic Farming Lessens Reliance on Pesticides and Promotes Public Health by Lowering Dietary Risks. Agronomy 2021, 11, 1266. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11071266

AMA Style

Benbrook C, Kegley S, Baker B. Organic Farming Lessens Reliance on Pesticides and Promotes Public Health by Lowering Dietary Risks. Agronomy. 2021; 11(7):1266. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11071266

Chicago/Turabian Style

Benbrook, Charles, Susan Kegley, and Brian Baker. 2021. "Organic Farming Lessens Reliance on Pesticides and Promotes Public Health by Lowering Dietary Risks" Agronomy 11, no. 7: 1266. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11071266

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