Next Article in Journal
Rock Phosphate-Enriched Compost in Combination with Rhizobacteria; A Cost-Effective Source for Better Soil Health and Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Productivity
Next Article in Special Issue
The Use of Dewpoint Hygrometry to Measure Low Water Potentials in Soilless Substrate Components and Composites
Previous Article in Journal
Indigo as a Plant Growth Inhibitory Chemical from the Fruit Pulp of Couroupita guianensis Aubl.
Previous Article in Special Issue
Strategies for Improved Yield and Water Use Efficiency of Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) through Simplified Soilless Cultivation under Semi-Arid Climate
Open AccessArticle

Comparison of Water Capture Efficiency through Two Irrigation Techniques of Three Common Greenhouse Soilless Substrate Components

1
Department of Horticultural Science, North Carolina State University, 21 Kilgore Hall, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
2
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, North Carolina State University, 3410 Williams Hall, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
3
U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory, USDA-ARS, 2001 S. Rock Rd., Fort Pierce, FL 34945, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(9), 1389; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10091389
Received: 24 July 2020 / Revised: 8 September 2020 / Accepted: 10 September 2020 / Published: 14 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soilless Culture, Growing Media and Horticultural Plants)
Substrate wettability is an important factor in determining effective and efficient irrigation techniques for container-grown crops. Reduced substrate wettability can lead to lower substrate water capture, excessive leaching and poor plant growth. This research examined substrate water capture using surface and subirrigation under three initial moisture contents (IMC). Sphagnum peat moss, coconut coir, and pine bark were tested at IMCs of 67% 50%, and 33%. Substrate water capture was influenced by both IMC and irrigation technique. Surface irrigation increased the water capture of coir and peat, regardless of IMC, whereas IMC influenced pine bark water capture more than irrigation method. Surface-irrigated coir at or above 50% IMC provided the greatest water capture across all treatments. The first irrigation had the highest capture rate compared to all other events combined. Container capacities of pine bark and coir were unaffected by IMC and irrigation type, but the CC of peat was less by ~ 40% volumetrically under low IMC conditions. Coir, had the greatest ability to capture water, followed by pine bark and peat, respectively. Moisture content, irrigation type and component selection all influence the water capture efficiency of a container substrate. View Full-Text
Keywords: irrigation; soilless substrates; water; coconut coir; initial moisture; mass wetness; peatmoss; pine bark; wettability; capillary rise; container capacity; capture rate irrigation; soilless substrates; water; coconut coir; initial moisture; mass wetness; peatmoss; pine bark; wettability; capillary rise; container capacity; capture rate
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Schulker, B.A.; Jackson, B.E.; Fonteno, W.C.; Heitman, J.L.; Albano, J.P. Comparison of Water Capture Efficiency through Two Irrigation Techniques of Three Common Greenhouse Soilless Substrate Components. Agronomy 2020, 10, 1389.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop