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Open AccessArticle

Evaluation of Recycled Materials as Hydroponic Growing Media

1
School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Agriculture Building, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK
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School of Engineering, Drummond Building, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Present address: Department of Chemistry, Dainton Building, The University of Sheffield, Brook Hill, Sheffield S3 7HF, UK.
Agronomy 2020, 10(8), 1092; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10081092
Received: 18 June 2020 / Revised: 22 July 2020 / Accepted: 24 July 2020 / Published: 28 July 2020
Conventional soilless growing media, such as perlite, are mined from nonrenewable resources and can only be disposed of in landfills after limited use. There is a need to investigate novel, sustainable growing media adapted from waste or engineered to be reused over multiple cycles. This study investigated waste almond shells and a recycled plastic drainage plank as hydroponic growing media alternatives. Physiochemical properties were evaluated, and a germination and greenhouse growth trial was conducted to understand the effect these media have on production and nutritional quality of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Catalogna Verde). Drought testing was carried out to understand how the media affected the lettuce’s response to water stress. In comparison to perlite, yields under regular irrigation were reduced by 52% in almond shells and 72% in plastic planks, although lettuce grown in almond shells still obtained commercially relevant yields. Reduced yields in almond shells were likely caused by the shell’s high salinity. Lettuce growth in plastic planks was limited by impeded root growth and low water-holding capacity. In conclusion, with minor alterations, almond shells could be used as a sustainable growing media alternative to perlite in hydroponic lettuce production. More research is needed to manufacture the planks to be conducive to plant growth. View Full-Text
Keywords: hydroponics; soilless culture; growing media; perlite; almond shells; drought; sustainable agriculture; circular economy; waste management hydroponics; soilless culture; growing media; perlite; almond shells; drought; sustainable agriculture; circular economy; waste management
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kennard, N.; Stirling, R.; Prashar, A.; Lopez-Capel, E. Evaluation of Recycled Materials as Hydroponic Growing Media. Agronomy 2020, 10, 1092. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10081092

AMA Style

Kennard N, Stirling R, Prashar A, Lopez-Capel E. Evaluation of Recycled Materials as Hydroponic Growing Media. Agronomy. 2020; 10(8):1092. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10081092

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kennard, Nicole; Stirling, Ross; Prashar, Ankush; Lopez-Capel, Elisa. 2020. "Evaluation of Recycled Materials as Hydroponic Growing Media" Agronomy 10, no. 8: 1092. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10081092

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