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Open AccessArticle

Evaluation of the Effects of the Application of Glauconitic Fertilizer on Oat Development: A Two-Year Field-Based Investigation

1
Division for Geology, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 634050 Tomsk, Russia
2
Laboratory of Sedimentology and Paleobiosphere Evolution, University of Tyumen, 625003 Tyumen, Russia
3
Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra, India
4
Siberian Research Institute of Agriculture and Peat, Branch of the Siberian Federal Science Centre of Agrobiotechnologies, 3 Gagarina st., 634050 Tomsk, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(6), 872; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10060872
Received: 19 May 2020 / Revised: 16 June 2020 / Accepted: 17 June 2020 / Published: 18 June 2020
This study explores the fertilizer potential of glauconitic soil by monitoring its impact on the growth of plants during the second growing season after application. Our study documents a higher growth of oats (Avena sativa) in glauconitic amended soil compared to that recorded with the control sample at the end of a 97-day-long experiment. Concentrations of nutrients (K, P, ammonium, Ca, Mg) and pH of the soil increase sharply in the first growing season and mildly thereafter, after an initial concentration of 200 g·m−2 glauconite (equivalent to 2 t·ha−1). The pH of the glauconitic-amended soil increases from an initial 6.0 to 6.34 during the second season. Organic matter and nitrates decrease in the soil mixture at the end of the second growing season, while the exchangeable ammonium increases. Organic acids promote the mobility and bioavailability of nutrients in the soil. Glauconitic soil is particularly effective for weakly acidic soils with a low moisture content. The steady increase in total yield and plant height, and the slow-release of nutrients during the second growing season indicates that glauconitic soil can be an effective and eco-friendly fertilizer. View Full-Text
Keywords: glauconite; alternate potassium fertilizer; oat yield; waste rock; Western Siberia; soil glauconite; alternate potassium fertilizer; oat yield; waste rock; Western Siberia; soil
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rudmin, M.; Banerjee, S.; Makarov, B. Evaluation of the Effects of the Application of Glauconitic Fertilizer on Oat Development: A Two-Year Field-Based Investigation. Agronomy 2020, 10, 872. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10060872

AMA Style

Rudmin M, Banerjee S, Makarov B. Evaluation of the Effects of the Application of Glauconitic Fertilizer on Oat Development: A Two-Year Field-Based Investigation. Agronomy. 2020; 10(6):872. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10060872

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rudmin, Maxim; Banerjee, Santanu; Makarov, Boris. 2020. "Evaluation of the Effects of the Application of Glauconitic Fertilizer on Oat Development: A Two-Year Field-Based Investigation" Agronomy 10, no. 6: 872. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10060872

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