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Open AccessArticle

In Vitro Rooting Response of Yellow-Flowered Magnolia in Relation to the Phenolic Acids Content

1
Department of Applied Biology, Research Institute of Horticulture, Konstytucji 3 Maja 1/3 Str., 96-100 Skierniewice, Poland
2
Department of Biotechnology, Franciszek Górski Institute of Plant Physiology of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 30-239 Kracov, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(12), 1880; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10121880
Received: 30 October 2020 / Revised: 23 November 2020 / Accepted: 25 November 2020 / Published: 27 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultivated Ornamental Plants: Breeding Aspects)
The aim of this study was to analyze the profile of endogenous phenolic acids in yellow-flowered magnolias and to evaluate the effects of endogenous and exogenous phenolic acids on the in vitro rooting of three magnolia cultivars (‘Butterflies’, ‘Yellow Bird’, and ‘Elizabeth’). It has been shown that magnolia cultivars are phenolic acid-rich plants. Of the 16 phenolic acids tested, all were detected in each magnolia cultivar. The most abundant was gallic acid (max. 34,946 ng·mg−1 dry mass), followed by chlorogenic acid, ferulic acid, and caffeic acid. The amount of individual phenolic acids differed between the cultivars and media. The total phenolic production was enhanced by auxin, the main factor promoting rooting in magnolia in vitro. It has been found that the difficult-to-root ‘Butterflies’ and ‘Yellow Bird’ rooted better when they were grown on medium containing a mixture of auxins—3-indolebutyric acid (IBA) and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA)—as compared to IBA alone. The highest rooting frequency was observed for ‘Elizabeth’ (95.8%), followed by ‘Butterflies’ (46.1%) and ‘Yellow Bird’ (21.4%). In the case of ‘Yellow Bird’, the auxin treatment enhanced the leaf yellowing. The present work indicates a clear relationship between the overaccumulation of chlorogenic acid and coumaric acid in the late phase of rooting in vitro and the low rooting responses of magnolia ‘Butterflies’ and ‘Yellow Bird’. On the other hand, ‘Elizabeth’ produced more soluble sugars by 29.2% than easy-to-root ones. The biochemical status of the plantlets can influence their further ex vitro establishment, which was the highest for ‘Elizabeth’ (97.5%), followed by ‘Butterflies’ (49.9%) and ‘Yellow Bird’ (24.6%). View Full-Text
Keywords: auxin; coumaric acid; chlorogenic acid; gallic acid; Magnolia; phenolics profile; root formation auxin; coumaric acid; chlorogenic acid; gallic acid; Magnolia; phenolics profile; root formation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wojtania, A.; Dziurka, M.; Skrzypek, E. In Vitro Rooting Response of Yellow-Flowered Magnolia in Relation to the Phenolic Acids Content. Agronomy 2020, 10, 1880. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10121880

AMA Style

Wojtania A, Dziurka M, Skrzypek E. In Vitro Rooting Response of Yellow-Flowered Magnolia in Relation to the Phenolic Acids Content. Agronomy. 2020; 10(12):1880. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10121880

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wojtania, Agnieszka; Dziurka, Michał; Skrzypek, Edyta. 2020. "In Vitro Rooting Response of Yellow-Flowered Magnolia in Relation to the Phenolic Acids Content" Agronomy 10, no. 12: 1880. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10121880

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