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The Mineral Composition of Wild-Type and Cultivated Varieties of Pasture Species

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Sustainable Agriculture Sciences, Rothamsted Research, North Wyke, Okehampton, Devon EX20 2SB, UK
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Sustainable Agriculture Sciences, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK
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Bristol Veterinary School, University of Bristol, Langford, Somerset BS40 5DU, UK
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Computational and Analytical Sciences, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(10), 1463; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10101463
Received: 21 August 2020 / Revised: 17 September 2020 / Accepted: 22 September 2020 / Published: 24 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Grassland and Pasture Science)
Mineral deficiencies in livestock are often prevented by using prophylactic supplementation, which is imprecise and inefficient. Instead, the trend for increased species diversity in swards is an opportunity to improve mineral concentrations in the basal diet. Currently, there are limited data on the mineral concentrations of different species and botanical groups, particularly for I and Se, which are among the most deficient minerals in livestock diets. We grew 21 pasture species, including some cultivar/wild type comparisons, of grasses, legumes and forbs, as single species stands in a pot study in a standard growth medium. Herbage concentrations of Co, Cu, I, Mn, Se, Zn, S, Mo and Fe showed no consistent differences between the wild and cultivated types. There were significant differences between botanical groups for many minerals tested. Forbs were highest in I and Se, grasses in Mn and legumes in Cu, Co, Zn and Fe. Comparing species concentrations to recommended livestock intakes, the forbs Achillea millefolium, Cichorium intybus and Plantago lanceolata, and the legumes Medicago lupulina, Trifolium hybridum and Lotus corniculatus, appear to be good sources of Co, Cu, I, Se and Zn. Further work is required to ensure these results are consistent in multispecies mixtures, in different soil types and in field trials. View Full-Text
Keywords: micronutrients; trace elements; antagonism; livestock intake; multispecies; multifunctional; sward; forb; legume; grass micronutrients; trace elements; antagonism; livestock intake; multispecies; multifunctional; sward; forb; legume; grass
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MDPI and ACS Style

Darch, T.; McGrath, S.P.; Lee, M.R.F.; Beaumont, D.A.; Blackwell, M.S.A.; Horrocks, C.A.; Evans, J.; Storkey, J. The Mineral Composition of Wild-Type and Cultivated Varieties of Pasture Species. Agronomy 2020, 10, 1463. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10101463

AMA Style

Darch T, McGrath SP, Lee MRF, Beaumont DA, Blackwell MSA, Horrocks CA, Evans J, Storkey J. The Mineral Composition of Wild-Type and Cultivated Varieties of Pasture Species. Agronomy. 2020; 10(10):1463. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10101463

Chicago/Turabian Style

Darch, Tegan, Steve P. McGrath, Michael R.F. Lee, Deborah A. Beaumont, Martin S.A. Blackwell, Claire A. Horrocks, Jessica Evans, and Jonathan Storkey. 2020. "The Mineral Composition of Wild-Type and Cultivated Varieties of Pasture Species" Agronomy 10, no. 10: 1463. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10101463

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