Next Article in Journal
Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Materials as Selective Recognition Sorbents for Explosives: A Review
Previous Article in Journal
Dextran-Coated Zinc-Doped Hydroxyapatite for Biomedical Applications
Previous Article in Special Issue
Inductive Heating Using a High-Magnetic-Field Pulse to Initiate Chemical Reactions to Generate Composite Materials
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

The Effects of Magnetic Field Alignment on Lithium Ion Transport in a Polymer Electrolyte Membrane with Lamellar Morphology

1
Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, 02098 Warsaw, Poland
2
Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Current address: Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
Polymers 2019, 11(5), 887; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11050887
Received: 13 February 2019 / Revised: 7 May 2019 / Accepted: 9 May 2019 / Published: 15 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Field in Polymer Research)
  |  
PDF [5538 KB, uploaded 15 May 2019]
  |  

Abstract

The transport properties of block copolymer-derived polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) are sensitive to microstructural disorder originating in the randomly oriented microdomains produced during uncontrolled self-assembly by microphase separation. This microstructural disorder can negatively impact performance due to the presence of conductivity-impeding grain boundaries and the resulting tortuosity of transport pathways. We use magnetic fields to control the orientational order of Li-doped lamellar polyethylene oxide (PEO) microdomains in a liquid crystalline diblock copolymer over large length scales (>3 mm). Microdomain alignment results in an increase in the conductivity of the membrane, but the improvement relative to non-aligned samples is modest, and limited to roughly 50% in the best cases. This limited increase is in stark contrast to the order of magnitude improvement observed for magnetically aligned cylindrical microdomains of PEO. Further, the temperature dependence of the conductivity of lamellar microdomains is seemingly insensitive to the order-disorder phase transition, again in marked contrast to the behavior of cylinder-forming materials. The data are confronted with theoretical predictions of the microstructural model developed by Sax and Ottino. The disparity between the conductivity enhancements obtained by domain alignment of cylindrical and lamellar systems is rationalized in terms of the comparative ease of percolation due to the intersection of randomly oriented lamellar domains (2D sheets) versus the quasi-1D cylindrical domains. These results have important implications for the development of methods to maximize PEM conductivity in electrochemical devices, including batteries. View Full-Text
Keywords: block copolymers; polyelectrolyte membrane; lithium transport; directed self-assembly; charge transport; magnetic alignment block copolymers; polyelectrolyte membrane; lithium transport; directed self-assembly; charge transport; magnetic alignment
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Majewski, P.W.; Gopinadhan, M.; Osuji, C.O. The Effects of Magnetic Field Alignment on Lithium Ion Transport in a Polymer Electrolyte Membrane with Lamellar Morphology. Polymers 2019, 11, 887.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Polymers EISSN 2073-4360 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top