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Magnetic Processing of Diamagnetic Materials

1
Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo Metropolitan University,1-1 Minami-ohsawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397, Japan
2
Division of Forestry and Biomaterials, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan
3
Fukui University of Technology, 3-6-1 Gakuen, Fukui 910-8505, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Polymers 2020, 12(7), 1491; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12071491
Received: 4 June 2020 / Revised: 30 June 2020 / Accepted: 1 July 2020 / Published: 3 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Field in Polymer Research)
Currently, materials scientists and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopists have easy access to high magnetic fields of approximately 10 T supplied by superconducting magnets. Neodymium magnets that generate magnetic fields of approximately 1 T are readily available for laboratory use and are widely used in daily life applications, such as mobile phones and electric vehicles. Such common access to magnetic fields—unexpected 30 years ago—has helped researchers discover new magnetic phenomena and use such phenomena to process diamagnetic materials. Although diamagnetism is well known, it is only during the last 30 years that researchers have applied magnetic processing to various classes of diamagnetic materials such as ceramics, biomaterials, and polymers. The magnetic effects that we report herein are largely attributable to the magnetic force, magnetic torque, and magnetic enthalpy that in turn, directly derive from the well-defined magnetic energy. An example of a more complex magnetic effect is orientation of crystalline polymers under an applied magnetic field; researchers do not yet fully understand the crystallization mechanism. Our review largely focuses on polymeric materials. Research topics such as magnetic effect on chiral recognition are interesting yet beyond our scope. View Full-Text
Keywords: magnetic force; magnetic torque; separation; particle manipulation and patterning; crystallization; magnetic dipole–dipole interaction; orientation; levitation; thermodynamics magnetic force; magnetic torque; separation; particle manipulation and patterning; crystallization; magnetic dipole–dipole interaction; orientation; levitation; thermodynamics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yamato, M.; Kimura, T. Magnetic Processing of Diamagnetic Materials. Polymers 2020, 12, 1491. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12071491

AMA Style

Yamato M, Kimura T. Magnetic Processing of Diamagnetic Materials. Polymers. 2020; 12(7):1491. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12071491

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yamato, Masafumi; Kimura, Tsunehisa. 2020. "Magnetic Processing of Diamagnetic Materials" Polymers 12, no. 7: 1491. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12071491

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