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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Microstructure, Texture, and Strength Development during High-Pressure Torsion of CrMnFeCoNi High-Entropy Alloy

1
Institute of Solid State and Materials Physics, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden, Germany
2
Department of Materials Physics, Eötvös University, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary
3
Materials Performance Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
4
Department of Materials Science, Chair of Materials Physics, Montanuniversität Leoben, A-8700 Leoben, Austria
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Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 8700 Leoben, Austria
6
Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA
7
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Crystals 2020, 10(4), 336; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst10040336
Received: 27 March 2020 / Revised: 19 April 2020 / Accepted: 20 April 2020 / Published: 24 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crystal Plasticity)
The equiatomic face-centered cubic high-entropy alloy CrMnFeCoNi was severely deformed at room and liquid nitrogen temperature by high-pressure torsion up to shear strains of about 170. Its microstructure was analyzed by X-ray line profile analysis and transmission electron microscopy and its texture by X-ray microdiffraction. Microhardness measurements, after severe plastic deformation, were done at room temperature. It is shown that at a shear strain of about 20, a steady state grain size of 24 nm, and a dislocation density of the order of 1016 m−2 is reached. The dislocations are mainly screw-type with low dipole character. Mechanical twinning at room temperature is replaced by a martensitic phase transformation at 77 K. The texture developed at room temperature is typical for sheared face-centered cubic nanocrystalline metals, but it is extremely weak and becomes almost random after high-pressure torsion at 77 K. The strength of the nanocrystalline material produced by high-pressure torsion at 77 K is lower than that produced at room temperature. The results are discussed in terms of different mechanisms of deformation, including dislocation generation and propagation, twinning, grain boundary sliding, and phase transformation. View Full-Text
Keywords: high-entropy alloy; high-pressure torsion; microstructure; texture; phase transformation; strength high-entropy alloy; high-pressure torsion; microstructure; texture; phase transformation; strength
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Skrotzki, W.; Pukenas, A.; Odor, E.; Joni, B.; Ungar, T.; Völker, B.; Hohenwarter, A.; Pippan, R.; George, E.P. Microstructure, Texture, and Strength Development during High-Pressure Torsion of CrMnFeCoNi High-Entropy Alloy. Crystals 2020, 10, 336.

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