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Article

Colorectal Cancer Patients Have Four Specific Bacterial Species in Oral and Gut Microbiota in Common—A Metagenomic Comparison with Healthy Subjects

1
Department of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Field of Oral and Maxillofacial Rehabilitation, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1, Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544, Japan
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Department of Molecular Microbiology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
3
Department of Digestive Surgery, Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1, Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520, Japan
4
Breast Surgery, Fujita Health University Hospital, 1-98, Dengakubo, Kutsukake, Toyoake, Aichi 470-1192, Japan
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Department of Digestive Surgery, Imakiire General Hospital, 43-25, Korai, Kagoshima 890-0051, Japan
6
Kajikionsen Hospital, 4714, Kida, Kajiki, Aira, Kagoshima 899-5241, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Leticia Moreira
Cancers 2021, 13(13), 3332; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13133332
Received: 18 May 2021 / Revised: 23 June 2021 / Accepted: 25 June 2021 / Published: 2 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Colorectal Cancer)
The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been increasing in recent years, and the gut microbiota is nowadays considered to be involved in the progression of CRC. Recent studies have investigated the involvement of the oral microbiota in CRC development using saliva and stool samples. However, the details regarding how oral bacteria alter the gut microbiota and affect CRC carcinogenesis remain unclear. In the present study, we identified four bacterial species that may affect the carcinogenesis and progression of CRC. These microorganisms may be potential biomarkers in saliva for diagnosing CRC.
Oral microbiota is reportedly associated with gut microbiota and influences colorectal cancer (CRC) progression; however, the details remain unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the role of oral microbiota in CRC progression. Fifty-two patients with CRC and 51 healthy controls were included. Saliva and stool samples were collected, and microbiota were evaluated using 16S rRNA analysis and next-generation sequencing. Comparative analysis was performed on both groups. Linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe) revealed the presence of indigenous oral bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus, Streptococcus, and Solobacterium spp., at a significantly higher relative abundance in saliva and stool samples of CRC patients compared with controls. Next, CRC patients were divided into early stage (Stage I, II; n = 26; 50%) and advanced stage (Stage III, IV; n = 26; 50%) disease. LEfSe revealed that S. moorei was present at a significantly higher relative abundance in the advanced-stage group compared with the early-stage group, again consistent for both saliva and stool samples. Among bacterial species with significantly higher relative abundance in CRC patients, P. stomatis, S. anginosus, S. koreensis, and S. moorei originated from the oral cavity, suggesting indigenous oral bacteria may have promoted initiation of CRC carcinogenesis. Furthermore, S. moorei may influence CRC progression. View Full-Text
Keywords: microbiota; oral bacteria; colorectal cancer; Peptostreptococcus; Streptococcus; Solobacterium spp. microbiota; oral bacteria; colorectal cancer; Peptostreptococcus; Streptococcus; Solobacterium spp.
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MDPI and ACS Style

Uchino, Y.; Goto, Y.; Konishi, Y.; Tanabe, K.; Toda, H.; Wada, M.; Kita, Y.; Beppu, M.; Mori, S.; Hijioka, H.; Otsuka, T.; Natsugoe, S.; Hara, E.; Sugiura, T. Colorectal Cancer Patients Have Four Specific Bacterial Species in Oral and Gut Microbiota in Common—A Metagenomic Comparison with Healthy Subjects. Cancers 2021, 13, 3332. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13133332

AMA Style

Uchino Y, Goto Y, Konishi Y, Tanabe K, Toda H, Wada M, Kita Y, Beppu M, Mori S, Hijioka H, Otsuka T, Natsugoe S, Hara E, Sugiura T. Colorectal Cancer Patients Have Four Specific Bacterial Species in Oral and Gut Microbiota in Common—A Metagenomic Comparison with Healthy Subjects. Cancers. 2021; 13(13):3332. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13133332

Chicago/Turabian Style

Uchino, Yoshinori, Yuichi Goto, Yusuke Konishi, Kan Tanabe, Hiroko Toda, Masumi Wada, Yoshiaki Kita, Mahiro Beppu, Shinichiro Mori, Hiroshi Hijioka, Takao Otsuka, Shoji Natsugoe, Eiji Hara, and Tsuyoshi Sugiura. 2021. "Colorectal Cancer Patients Have Four Specific Bacterial Species in Oral and Gut Microbiota in Common—A Metagenomic Comparison with Healthy Subjects" Cancers 13, no. 13: 3332. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13133332

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