Next Article in Journal
Transitions of Liver and Biliary Enzymes during Proton Beam Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Next Article in Special Issue
RAD51-Mediated DNA Homologous Recombination Is Independent of PTEN Mutational Status
Previous Article in Journal
Mambalgin-2 Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Glioma Cells via Interaction with ASIC1a
Previous Article in Special Issue
XRN2 Links RNA:DNA Hybrid Resolution to Double Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice
Review

Regulation of DNA Damage Response and Homologous Recombination Repair by microRNA in Human Cells Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, 90-236 Lodz, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2020, 12(7), 1838; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12071838
Received: 7 May 2020 / Revised: 26 June 2020 / Accepted: 29 June 2020 / Published: 8 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DNA Damage and Repair in Cancers)
Ionizing radiation may be of both artificial and natural origin and causes cellular damage in living organisms. Radioactive isotopes have been used significantly in cancer therapy for many years. The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is the most dangerous effect of ionizing radiation on the cellular level. After irradiation, cells activate a DNA damage response, the molecular path that determines the fate of the cell. As an important element of this, homologous recombination repair is a crucial pathway for the error-free repair of DNA lesions. All components of DNA damage response are regulated by specific microRNAs. MicroRNAs are single-stranded short noncoding RNAs of 20–25 nt in length. They are directly involved in the regulation of gene expression by repressing translation or by cleaving target mRNA. In the present review, we analyze the biological mechanisms by which miRNAs regulate cell response to ionizing radiation-induced double-stranded breaks with an emphasis on DNA repair by homologous recombination, and its main component, the RAD51 recombinase. On the other hand, we discuss the ability of DNA damage response proteins to launch particular miRNA expression and modulate the course of this process. A full understanding of cell response processes to radiation-induced DNA damage will allow us to develop new and more effective methods of ionizing radiation therapy for cancers, and may help to develop methods for preventing the harmful effects of ionizing radiation on healthy organisms. View Full-Text
Keywords: DNA damage response; double-strand DNA breaks; ionizing radiation; microRNA; cancer therapy DNA damage response; double-strand DNA breaks; ionizing radiation; microRNA; cancer therapy
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Szatkowska, M.; Krupa, R. Regulation of DNA Damage Response and Homologous Recombination Repair by microRNA in Human Cells Exposed to Ionizing Radiation. Cancers 2020, 12, 1838. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12071838

AMA Style

Szatkowska M, Krupa R. Regulation of DNA Damage Response and Homologous Recombination Repair by microRNA in Human Cells Exposed to Ionizing Radiation. Cancers. 2020; 12(7):1838. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12071838

Chicago/Turabian Style

Szatkowska, Magdalena, and Renata Krupa. 2020. "Regulation of DNA Damage Response and Homologous Recombination Repair by microRNA in Human Cells Exposed to Ionizing Radiation" Cancers 12, no. 7: 1838. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12071838

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop