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Open AccessReview

Renal Tumors of Childhood—A Histopathologic Pattern-Based Diagnostic Approach

1
Princess Máxima Center for pediatric oncology, 3584 CS Utrecht, The Netherlands
2
Pathan B.V., 3045 PM Rotterdam, The Netherlands
3
Department of Pathology, Sidra Medicine, Doha 0000, Qatar
4
Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, 0372 Oslo, Norway
5
Department of Diagnostic Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, 20133 Milan, Italy
6
Sorbonne Université, Department of Pathology, Hôpital Armand Trousseau, Hopitaux Universitaires Est Parisien, 75012 Paris, France
7
Section of Pediatric Pathology, Department of Pathology, University Hospital Bonn, 53127 Bonn, Germany
8
Department of Pediatric Oncology & Hematology, Saarland University, D-66421 Homburg, Germany
9
Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this paper as first authors.
Cancers 2020, 12(3), 729; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12030729 (registering DOI)
Received: 2 February 2020 / Revised: 4 March 2020 / Accepted: 7 March 2020 / Published: 19 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathogenesis and Diagnosis of Genitourinary Cancer)
Renal tumors comprise approximately 7% of all malignant pediatric tumors. This is a highly heterogeneous group of tumors, each with its own therapeutic management, outcome, and association with germline predispositions. Histopathology is the key in establishing the correct diagnosis, and therefore pathologists with expertise in pediatric oncology are needed for dealing with these rare tumors. While each tumor shows different histologic features, they do have considerable overlap in cell type and histologic pattern, making the diagnosis difficult to establish, if based on routine histology alone. To this end, ancillary techniques, such as immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis, can be of great importance for the correct diagnosis, resulting in appropriate treatment. To use ancillary techniques cost-effectively, we propose a pattern-based approach and provide recommendations to aid in deciding which panel of antibodies, supplemented by molecular characterization of a subset of genes, are required. View Full-Text
Keywords: pediatric; oncology; renal tumors; immunohistochemistry; molecular analysis pediatric; oncology; renal tumors; immunohistochemistry; molecular analysis
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Ooms, A.H.; Vujanić, G.M.; D’Hooghe, E.; Collini, P.; L’Herminé-Coulomb, A.; Vokuhl, C.; Graf, N.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M.M.; de Krijger, R.R. Renal Tumors of Childhood—A Histopathologic Pattern-Based Diagnostic Approach. Cancers 2020, 12, 729.

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