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Review

Patient Derived Models to Study Head and Neck Cancer Radiation Response

1
Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53705, USA
2
Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, UW Carbone Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53705, USA
3
Departments of Translational Hematology and Oncology Research and Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
4
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, UW Carbone Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53705, USA
5
Department of Human Oncology, UW Carbone Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53705, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2020, 12(2), 419; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12020419
Received: 18 January 2020 / Revised: 8 February 2020 / Accepted: 9 February 2020 / Published: 12 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Models for Radiotherapy Research)
Patient-derived model systems are important tools for studying novel anti-cancer therapies. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) have gained favor over the last 10 years as newer mouse strains have improved the success rate of establishing PDXs from patient biopsies. PDXs can be engrafted from head and neck cancer (HNC) samples across a wide range of cancer stages, retain the genetic features of their human source, and can be treated with both chemotherapy and radiation, allowing for clinically relevant studies. Not only do PDXs allow for the study of patient tissues in an in vivo model, they can also provide a renewable source of cancer cells for organoid cultures. Herein, we review the uses of HNC patient-derived models for radiation research, including approaches to establishing both orthotopic and heterotopic PDXs, approaches and potential pitfalls to delivering chemotherapy and radiation to these animal models, biological advantages and limitations, and alternatives to animal studies that still use patient-derived tissues. View Full-Text
Keywords: head and neck cancer; radiation therapy; radiation; patient-derived models; cancer head and neck cancer; radiation therapy; radiation; patient-derived models; cancer
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cosper, P.F.; Abel, L.; Lee, Y.-S.; Paz, C.; Kaushik, S.; Nickel, K.P.; Alexandridis, R.; Scott, J.G.; Bruce, J.Y.; Kimple, R.J. Patient Derived Models to Study Head and Neck Cancer Radiation Response. Cancers 2020, 12, 419. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12020419

AMA Style

Cosper PF, Abel L, Lee Y-S, Paz C, Kaushik S, Nickel KP, Alexandridis R, Scott JG, Bruce JY, Kimple RJ. Patient Derived Models to Study Head and Neck Cancer Radiation Response. Cancers. 2020; 12(2):419. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12020419

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cosper, Pippa F., Lindsey Abel, Yong-Syu Lee, Cristina Paz, Saakshi Kaushik, Kwangok P. Nickel, Roxana Alexandridis, Jacob G. Scott, Justine Y. Bruce, and Randall J. Kimple 2020. "Patient Derived Models to Study Head and Neck Cancer Radiation Response" Cancers 12, no. 2: 419. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12020419

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