Next Article in Journal
Inhibition of Serum Response Factor Improves Response to Enzalutamide in Prostate Cancer
Next Article in Special Issue
Identifying Ovarian Cancer in Symptomatic Women: A Systematic Review of Clinical Tools
Previous Article in Journal
The Tumor Microenvironment—A Metabolic Obstacle to NK Cells’ Activity
Previous Article in Special Issue
Rare Germline Genetic Variants and the Risks of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer
Open AccessArticle

Women’s Intentions to Engage in Risk-Reducing Behaviours after Receiving Personal Ovarian Cancer Risk Information: An Experimental Survey Study

1
Research Department of Behavioural Science and Health, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
2
Cancer Prevention Group, School of Cancer & Pharmaceutical Sciences, King’s College London, Guy’s Hospital, Great Maze Pond, London SE1 9RT, UK
3
Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK
4
Department of Gynaecological Oncology, Barts Health NHS Trust, London EC1A 7BE, UK
5
Department of Women’s Health, University of New South Wales, Australia, Level 1, Chancellery Building, Sydney 2052, Australia
6
Early Disease Detection Research Project UK (EDDRP UK), 2 Redman Place, London E20 1JQ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2020, 12(12), 3543; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12123543
Received: 5 October 2020 / Revised: 11 November 2020 / Accepted: 24 November 2020 / Published: 27 November 2020
Risk stratification using genetic testing to identify women at increased risk of ovarian cancer may increase the number of patients to whom risk-reducing surgery (e.g., salpingo-oophorectomy) may be offered. However, little is known about public acceptability of such approaches. Our online experimental survey aimed to explore whether women aged 45–75 in the general population are willing to undergo ovarian cancer risk assessment, including genetic testing, and whether women’s potential acceptance of risk-reducing surgery differs depending on their estimated risk. We looked at whether psychological and cognitive factors mediated women’s decision-making. The majority of participants would be interested in having genetic testing. In response to our hypothetical scenarios, a substantial proportion of participants were open to the idea of surgery to reduce risk of ovarian cancer, even if their absolute lifetime risk is only increased from 2% to 5 or 10%.
Risk stratification using genetic and/or other types of information could identify women at increased ovarian cancer risk. The aim of this study was to examine women’s potential reactions to ovarian cancer risk stratification. A total of 1017 women aged 45–75 years took part in an online experimental survey. Women were randomly assigned to one of three experimental conditions describing hypothetical personal results from ovarian cancer risk stratification, and asked to imagine they had received one of three results: (a) 5% lifetime risk due to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and lifestyle factors; (b) 10% lifetime risk due to SNPs and lifestyle factors; (c) 10% lifetime risk due to a single rare mutation in a gene. Results: 83% of women indicated interest in having ovarian cancer risk assessment. After receiving their hypothetical risk estimates, 29% of women stated they would have risk-reducing surgery. Choosing risk-reducing surgery over other behavioural responses was associated with having higher surgery self-efficacy and perceived response-efficacy, but not with perceptions of disease threat, i.e., perceived risk or severity, or with experimental condition. A substantial proportion of women age 45–75 years may be open to the idea of surgery to reduce risk of ovarian cancer, even if their absolute lifetime risk is only increased to as little as 5 or 10%. View Full-Text
Keywords: risk stratification; genomics; questionnaires; attitudes risk stratification; genomics; questionnaires; attitudes
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Gallagher, A.; Waller, J.; Manchanda, R.; Jacobs, I.; Sanderson, S. Women’s Intentions to Engage in Risk-Reducing Behaviours after Receiving Personal Ovarian Cancer Risk Information: An Experimental Survey Study. Cancers 2020, 12, 3543. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12123543

AMA Style

Gallagher A, Waller J, Manchanda R, Jacobs I, Sanderson S. Women’s Intentions to Engage in Risk-Reducing Behaviours after Receiving Personal Ovarian Cancer Risk Information: An Experimental Survey Study. Cancers. 2020; 12(12):3543. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12123543

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gallagher, Ailish; Waller, Jo; Manchanda, Ranjit; Jacobs, Ian; Sanderson, Saskia. 2020. "Women’s Intentions to Engage in Risk-Reducing Behaviours after Receiving Personal Ovarian Cancer Risk Information: An Experimental Survey Study" Cancers 12, no. 12: 3543. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12123543

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop