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Non-Canonical Functions of the Gamma-Tubulin Meshwork in the Regulation of the Nuclear Architecture

Molecular Pathology, Department of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital Malmö, SE-20502 Malmö, Sweden
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Cancers 2020, 12(11), 3102; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12113102
Received: 1 October 2020 / Revised: 17 October 2020 / Accepted: 21 October 2020 / Published: 23 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Cancer Biology)
The appearance of a cell is connected to its function. For example, the fusiform of smooth muscle cells is adapted to facilitate muscle contraction, the lobed nucleus in white blood cells assists with the migratory behavior of these immune cells, and the condensed nucleus in sperm aids in their swimming efficiency. Thus, changes in appearance have been used for decades by doctors as a diagnostic method for human cancers. Here, we summarize our knowledge of how a cell maintains the shape of the nuclear compartment. Specifically, we discuss the role of a novel protein meshwork, the gamma-tubulin meshwork, in the regulation of nuclear morphology and as a therapeutic target against cancer.
The nuclear architecture describes the organization of the various compartments in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, where a plethora of processes such as nucleocytoplasmic transport, gene expression, and assembly of ribosomal subunits occur in a dynamic manner. During the different phases of the cell cycle, in post-mitotic cells and after oncogenic transformation, rearrangements of the nuclear architecture take place, and, among other things, these alterations result in reorganization of the chromatin and changes in gene expression. A member of the tubulin family, γtubulin, was first identified as part of a multiprotein complex that allows nucleation of microtubules. However, more than a decade ago, γtubulin was also characterized as a nuclear protein that modulates several crucial processes that affect the architecture of the nucleus. This review presents the latest knowledge regarding changes that arise in the nuclear architecture of healthy cells and under pathological conditions and, more specifically, considers the particular involvement of γtubulin in the modulation of the biology of the nuclear compartment. View Full-Text
Keywords: γtubulin; nuclear architecture; cytoskeleton; nuclearskeleton; cancer; differentiation γtubulin; nuclear architecture; cytoskeleton; nuclearskeleton; cancer; differentiation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Corvaisier, M.; Alvarado-Kristensson, M. Non-Canonical Functions of the Gamma-Tubulin Meshwork in the Regulation of the Nuclear Architecture. Cancers 2020, 12, 3102. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12113102

AMA Style

Corvaisier M, Alvarado-Kristensson M. Non-Canonical Functions of the Gamma-Tubulin Meshwork in the Regulation of the Nuclear Architecture. Cancers. 2020; 12(11):3102. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12113102

Chicago/Turabian Style

Corvaisier, Matthieu; Alvarado-Kristensson, Maria. 2020. "Non-Canonical Functions of the Gamma-Tubulin Meshwork in the Regulation of the Nuclear Architecture" Cancers 12, no. 11: 3102. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12113102

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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