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Adjuvant Ipilimumab in High-Risk Uveal Melanoma

1
Department of Hematology/Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2
Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
3
Department of Melanoma Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
4
Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Section of Ophthalmology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2019, 11(2), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11020152
Received: 29 November 2018 / Revised: 14 January 2019 / Accepted: 21 January 2019 / Published: 29 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Uveal Melanoma)
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PDF [476 KB, uploaded 29 January 2019]
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Abstract

Uveal melanoma is a common intraocular malignant tumor that is uniformly fatal once metastatic. No effective adjuvant therapy currently exists to reduce the risk of distant metastasis after definitive treatment of the primary lesion. Immunotherapy has been used effectively in the adjuvant setting in locally advanced cutaneous melanoma. We performed a Phase I/II clinical trial of adjuvant ipilimumab in high-risk primary uveal melanoma with distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) as the primary objective. A total of 10 patients with genomically high-risk disease were treated: three at a dose of 3 mg/kg and seven at 10 mg/kg. Two of the seven patients at the higher dose had to discontinue therapy secondary to grade 3 toxicity. At 36 months follow-up, 80% of patients had no evidence of distant disease (95% CI, 58.7–100). With recent advancements in CTLA-4 inhibition, PD-1 inhibition, and combined checkpoint blockade, immunotherapy is a promising avenue of treatment in uveal melanoma. Further clinical trials are needed to elucidate the role of immunotherapy in the adjuvant setting. View Full-Text
Keywords: adjuvant; ipilimumab; high-risk; Class 2; uveal melanoma; clinical trial adjuvant; ipilimumab; high-risk; Class 2; uveal melanoma; clinical trial
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Fountain, E.; Bassett, R.L.; Cain, S.; Posada, L.; Gombos, D.S.; Hwu, P.; Bedikian, A.; Patel, S.P. Adjuvant Ipilimumab in High-Risk Uveal Melanoma. Cancers 2019, 11, 152.

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