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Destined to Die: Apoptosis and Pediatric Cancers

1
Department of Physiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117593, Singapore
2
VIVA-KKH Pediatric Brain and Solid Tumor Program, KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore 229899, Singapore
3
Department of Pediatric Surgery, KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore 229899, Singapore
4
National University Cancer Institute, Singapore, Singapore 119074, Singapore
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2019, 11(11), 1623; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11111623
Received: 16 September 2019 / Revised: 20 October 2019 / Accepted: 22 October 2019 / Published: 23 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Apoptosis in Cancer)
Apoptosis (programmed cell death) is a systematic and coordinated cellular process that occurs in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Sidestepping or resisting apoptosis is a distinct characteristic of human cancers including childhood malignancies. This review dissects the apoptosis pathways implicated in pediatric tumors. Understanding these pathways not only unraveled key molecules that may serve as potential targets for drug discovery, but also molecular nodes that integrate with other signaling networks involved in processes such as development. This review presents current knowledge of the complex regulatory system that governs apoptosis with respect to other processes in pediatric cancers, so that fresh insights may be derived regarding treatment resistance or for more effective treatment options. View Full-Text
Keywords: cancer; apoptosis; pediatric; development cancer; apoptosis; pediatric; development
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MDPI and ACS Style

Choo, Z.; Loh, A.H.P.; Chen, Z.X. Destined to Die: Apoptosis and Pediatric Cancers. Cancers 2019, 11, 1623. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11111623

AMA Style

Choo Z, Loh AHP, Chen ZX. Destined to Die: Apoptosis and Pediatric Cancers. Cancers. 2019; 11(11):1623. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11111623

Chicago/Turabian Style

Choo, Zhang’e; Loh, Amos H.P.; Chen, Zhi X. 2019. "Destined to Die: Apoptosis and Pediatric Cancers" Cancers 11, no. 11: 1623. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11111623

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