Next Article in Journal
An Implantable Cranial Window Using a Collagen Membrane for Chronic Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging
Previous Article in Journal
Whole Blood Based Multiparameter Assessment of Thrombus Formation in Standard Microfluidic Devices to Proxy In Vivo Haemostasis and Thrombosis
Open AccessArticle

Preparing Polypyrrole-Coated Stretchable Textile via Low-Temperature Interfacial Polymerization for Highly Sensitive Strain Sensor

by Xiaodie Chen 1,2, Bintian Li 1,2, Yan Qiao 1,2,* and Zhisong Lu 1,2,*
1
Key Laboratory of Luminescent and Real-Time Analytical Chemistry (Southwest University), Ministry of Education, School of Materials & Energy, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, China
2
Institute for Clean Energy & Advanced Materials, School of Materials & Energy, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Micromachines 2019, 10(11), 788; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10110788
Received: 27 October 2019 / Revised: 14 November 2019 / Accepted: 15 November 2019 / Published: 17 November 2019
The stretchable sensor has been considered as the most important component in a wearable device. However, it is still a great challenge to develop a highly sensitive textile-based strain sensor with good flexibility, excellent skin affinity, and large dynamic range. Herein, polypyrrole (PPy) was immobilized on a stretchable textile knitted by polyester and spandex via low-temperature interfacial polymerization to prepare a conductive strain sensor for human motion and respiration measurements. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and thermal gravimetric data verify that a thin layer of PPy has been successfully coated on the textile with a high density and very uniform distribution. The resistance of the as-prepared textile is 21.25 Ω/cm2 and the PPy-coated textile could be used as an electric conductor to light up a LED lamp. Moreover, the textile could tolerate folding at an angle of 180° and 500 times of bending-twisting cycles without significant changes on its resistance. A negative correlation between the resistance change and the applied strain is observed for the textile-based sensor in the strain ranging from 0 to 71% with the gauge factor of −0.46. After more than 200 cycles of stretching-releasing under the strain of 26%, there is no obvious alteration on the sensing responses. The sensors were attached on volunteers’ body or clothes for the real-time measurement of human motions and respiration, demonstrating that the textile-based sensor could sensitively detect finger, elbow, and knee bending and differentiate deep, normal, and fast breath. This work may provide an approach to uniform and dense coating conductive polymers on textiles for highly sensitive and stretchable sensors, which possess great potentials in practical applications for real-time monitoring human motions and physiological signs. View Full-Text
Keywords: textile; strain sensor; low-temperature interfacial polymerization; wearable electronics; human motion textile; strain sensor; low-temperature interfacial polymerization; wearable electronics; human motion
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Chen, X.; Li, B.; Qiao, Y.; Lu, Z. Preparing Polypyrrole-Coated Stretchable Textile via Low-Temperature Interfacial Polymerization for Highly Sensitive Strain Sensor. Micromachines 2019, 10, 788.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop