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Microfluidic Magnetic Mixing at Low Reynolds Numbers and in Stagnant Fluids

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Microsystems Research Section, and Institute for Complex Molecular Systems (ICMS), Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Polymer Technology Research Section, and Institute for Complex Molecular Systems (ICMS), Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Micromachines 2019, 10(11), 731; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10110731
Received: 26 September 2019 / Revised: 17 October 2019 / Accepted: 18 October 2019 / Published: 29 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 10th Anniversary of Micromachines)
Microfluidic mixing becomes a necessity when thorough sample homogenization is required in small volumes of fluid, such as in lab-on-a-chip devices. For example, efficient mixing is extraordinarily challenging in capillary-filling microfluidic devices and in microchambers with stagnant fluids. To address this issue, specifically designed geometrical features can enhance the effect of diffusion and provide efficient mixing by inducing chaotic fluid flow. This scheme is known as “passive” mixing. In addition, when rapid and global mixing is essential, “active” mixing can be applied by exploiting an external source. In particular, magnetic mixing (where a magnetic field acts to stimulate mixing) shows great potential for high mixing efficiency. This method generally involves magnetic beads and external (or integrated) magnets for the creation of chaotic motion in the device. However, there is still plenty of room for exploiting the potential of magnetic beads for mixing applications. Therefore, this review article focuses on the advantages of magnetic bead mixing along with recommendations on improving mixing in low Reynolds number flows (Re ≤ 1) and in stagnant fluids. View Full-Text
Keywords: microfluidics; magnetic micromixing; active and passive mixing; creeping flow microfluidics; magnetic micromixing; active and passive mixing; creeping flow
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shanko, E.-S.; van de Burgt, Y.; Anderson, P.D.; den Toonder, J.M.J. Microfluidic Magnetic Mixing at Low Reynolds Numbers and in Stagnant Fluids. Micromachines 2019, 10, 731.

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