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Article

Cyanobacterial Abundance and Microcystin Profiles in Two Southern British Lakes: The Importance of Abiotic and Biotic Interactions

1
The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), The Nothe, Barrack Road, Weymouth, Dorset DT4 8UB, UK
2
Centre for Ecology, Environment and Sustainability, Faculty of Science & Technology, Bournemouth University, Fern Barrow, Poole, Dorset BH12 5BB, UK
3
New South Wales Shellfish Program, NSW Food Authority, Taree 2430, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Toxins 2020, 12(8), 503; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12080503
Received: 5 June 2020 / Revised: 19 July 2020 / Accepted: 30 July 2020 / Published: 5 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Freshwater Algal Toxins: Monitoring and Toxicity Profile)
Freshwater cyanobacteria blooms represent a risk to ecological and human health through induction of anoxia and release of potent toxins; both conditions require water management to mitigate risks. Many cyanobacteria taxa may produce microcystins, a group of toxic cyclic heptapeptides. Understanding the relationships between the abiotic drivers of microcystins and their occurrence would assist in the implementation of targeted, cost-effective solutions to maintain safe drinking and recreational waters. Cyanobacteria and microcystins were measured by flow cytometry and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry in two interconnected reservoirs varying in age and management regimes, in southern Britain over a 12-month period. Microcystins were detected in both reservoirs, with significantly higher concentrations in the southern lake (maximum concentration >7 µg L−1). Elevated microcystin concentrations were not positively correlated with numbers of cyanobacterial cells, but multiple linear regression analysis suggested temperature and dissolved oxygen explained a significant amount of the variability in microcystin across both reservoirs. The presence of a managed fishery in one lake was associated with decreased microcystin levels, suggestive of top down control on cyanobacterial populations. This study supports the need to develop inclusive, multifactor holistic water management strategies to control cyanobacterial risks in freshwater bodies. View Full-Text
Keywords: flow cytometry; liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS); cyanotoxins; risk assessment; management strategies; modelling flow cytometry; liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS); cyanotoxins; risk assessment; management strategies; modelling
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hartnell, D.M.; Chapman, I.J.; Taylor, N.G.H.; Esteban, G.F.; Turner, A.D.; Franklin, D.J. Cyanobacterial Abundance and Microcystin Profiles in Two Southern British Lakes: The Importance of Abiotic and Biotic Interactions. Toxins 2020, 12, 503. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12080503

AMA Style

Hartnell DM, Chapman IJ, Taylor NGH, Esteban GF, Turner AD, Franklin DJ. Cyanobacterial Abundance and Microcystin Profiles in Two Southern British Lakes: The Importance of Abiotic and Biotic Interactions. Toxins. 2020; 12(8):503. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12080503

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hartnell, David M., Ian J. Chapman, Nick G.H. Taylor, Genoveva F. Esteban, Andrew D. Turner, and Daniel J. Franklin. 2020. "Cyanobacterial Abundance and Microcystin Profiles in Two Southern British Lakes: The Importance of Abiotic and Biotic Interactions" Toxins 12, no. 8: 503. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12080503

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