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Mitigating Aflatoxin Contamination in Groundnut through A Combination of Genetic Resistance and Post-Harvest Management Practices

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International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Hyderabad 502324, India
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Crop Protection and Management Research Unit, United State Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), Tifton, GA 31793, USA
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Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 31793, USA
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Oil Crops Research Institute (OCRI) of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS), Wuhan 430062, China
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International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Bamako BP 320, Mali
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International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Lilongwe PB 1096, Malawi
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Crops Research Institute (CRI) of Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences (GAAS), Guangzhou 510640, China
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Department of Plant and Soil Science, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA
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International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Niamey BP 12404, Niger
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Institute of Oil Crops, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, China
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Shandong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Jinan 250108, China
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Toxins 2019, 11(6), 315; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins11060315
Received: 16 April 2019 / Revised: 19 May 2019 / Accepted: 23 May 2019 / Published: 3 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Mycotoxins)
Aflatoxin is considered a “hidden poison” due to its slow and adverse effect on various biological pathways in humans, particularly among children, in whom it leads to delayed development, stunted growth, liver damage, and liver cancer. Unfortunately, the unpredictable behavior of the fungus as well as climatic conditions pose serious challenges in precise phenotyping, genetic prediction and genetic improvement, leaving the complete onus of preventing aflatoxin contamination in crops on post-harvest management. Equipping popular crop varieties with genetic resistance to aflatoxin is key to effective lowering of infection in farmer’s fields. A combination of genetic resistance for in vitro seed colonization (IVSC), pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination (PAC) and aflatoxin production together with pre- and post-harvest management may provide a sustainable solution to aflatoxin contamination. In this context, modern “omics” approaches, including next-generation genomics technologies, can provide improved and decisive information and genetic solutions. Preventing contamination will not only drastically boost the consumption and trade of the crops and products across nations/regions, but more importantly, stave off deleterious health problems among consumers across the globe. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aspergillus flavus; aflatoxin contamination; groundnut; genetic resistance; post-harvest management Aspergillus flavus; aflatoxin contamination; groundnut; genetic resistance; post-harvest management
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Pandey, M.K.; Kumar, R.; Pandey, A.K.; Soni, P.; Gangurde, S.S.; Sudini, H.K.; Fountain, J.C.; Liao, B.; Desmae, H.; Okori, P.; Chen, X.; Jiang, H.; Mendu, V.; Falalou, H.; Njoroge, S.; Mwololo, J.; Guo, B.; Zhuang, W.; Wang, X.; Liang, X.; Varshney, R.K. Mitigating Aflatoxin Contamination in Groundnut through A Combination of Genetic Resistance and Post-Harvest Management Practices. Toxins 2019, 11, 315.

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