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Toxins 2018, 10(9), 356; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins10090356

Release of Indospicine from Contaminated Camel Meat following Cooking and Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion: Implications for Human Consumption

1
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI), The University of Queensland, Health and Food Sciences Precinct, Coopers Plains, QLD 4108, Australia
2
Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Queensland Government, Health and Food Sciences Precinct, Coopers Plains, QLD 4108, Australia
3
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Agriculture and Food, St. Lucia, QLD 4067, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 25 May 2018 / Revised: 28 August 2018 / Accepted: 30 August 2018 / Published: 3 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Safety and Natural Toxins)
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Abstract

Indospicine, a hepatotoxic arginine analog, occurs in leguminous plants of the Indigofera genus and accumulates in the tissues of grazing animals that consume these plants. Furthermore, indospicine has caused toxicity in dogs following consumption of indospicine-contaminated meat; however, the potential impact on human health is unknown. The present study was designed to determine the effect of simulated human gastrointestinal digestion on the release and degradation of indospicine from contaminated camel meat following microwave cooking. Results showed no significant (p > 0.05) indospicine degradation during cooking or in vitro digestion. However, approximately 70% indospicine was released from the meat matrix into the liquid digesta during the gastric phase (in the presence of pepsin) and increased to >90% in the intestinal phase (with pancreatic enzymes). Following human consumption of contaminated meat, this soluble and more bioaccessible fraction of intact indospicine could be readily available for absorption by the small intestine, potentially circulating indospicine throughout the human body to tissues where it could accumulate and cause detrimental toxic effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: indospicine; hepatotoxicity; meat; in vitro digestion; human indospicine; hepatotoxicity; meat; in vitro digestion; human
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Sultan, S.; Giles, C.; Netzel, G.; Osborne, S.A.; Netzel, M.E.; Fletcher, M.T. Release of Indospicine from Contaminated Camel Meat following Cooking and Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion: Implications for Human Consumption. Toxins 2018, 10, 356.

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