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Open AccessArticle

Association of Dietary Sugars and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake with Obesity in Korean Children and Adolescents

1
Department of Public Health Nutrition, Graduate School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
2
Nutrition Policy and Promotion Team, Korea Health Industry Development Institute, Cheongju 28159, Korea
3
Bureau of Health Industry Promotion, Korea Health Industry Development Institute, Cheongju 28159, Korea
4
Department of Food and Nutrition, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Korea
5
Major of Food and Nutrition, School of Human Ecology, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon 14662, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2016, 8(1), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu8010031
Received: 2 November 2015 / Revised: 28 December 2015 / Accepted: 5 January 2016 / Published: 8 January 2016
Few studies have examined the association between dietary sugar intake and obesity in Asian children and adolescents. We evaluated the association of dietary sugar intake and its food source with obesity in Korean children and adolescents. In this cross-sectional analysis, data were obtained from five studies conducted between 2002 and 2011. The study included 2599 children and adolescents who had completed more than three days of dietary records and had anthropometric data. Total sugar intake was higher in girls than in boys (54.3 g for girls and 46.6 g for boys, p < 0.0001). Sugar intake from milk and fruits was inversely associated with overweight or obesity in girls only (OR for overweight, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.32–0.84; p for trend = 0.0246 and OR for obesity, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.23–0.79; p for trend = 0.0113). Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption was not associated with obesity in girls, while boys had lower odds ratios for obesity (OR for obesity, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.26–1.05; p for trend = 0.0310). These results suggest that total sugars and SSB intake in Asian children and adolescents remains relatively low and sugar intake from milk and fruits is associated with a decreased risk of overweight or obesity, especially in girls. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary sugars; sugar-sweetened beverage; sugars from milk and fruits; obesity; children; adolescents; Korean dietary sugars; sugar-sweetened beverage; sugars from milk and fruits; obesity; children; adolescents; Korean
MDPI and ACS Style

Ha, K.; Chung, S.; Lee, H.-S.; Kim, C.-I.; Joung, H.; Paik, H.-Y.; Song, Y. Association of Dietary Sugars and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake with Obesity in Korean Children and Adolescents. Nutrients 2016, 8, 31.

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