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The Role of Dietary Fat throughout the Prostate Cancer Trajectory
Open AccessArticle

An Investigation into the Association between DNA Damage and Dietary Fatty Acid in Men with Prostate Cancer

1
Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, FM & HS, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
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Discipline of Nutrition, FM & HS, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
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Nutrigenomics New Zealand, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2015, 7(1), 405-422; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu7010405
Received: 26 August 2014 / Accepted: 19 December 2014 / Published: 8 January 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Cancer)
Prostate cancer is a growing problem in New Zealand and worldwide, as populations adopt a Western style dietary pattern. In particular, dietary fat is believed to be associated with oxidative stress, which in turn may be associated with cancer risk and development. In addition, DNA damage is associated with the risk of various cancers, and is regarded as an ideal biomarker for the assessment of the influence of foods on cancer. In the study presented here, 20 men with prostate cancer adhered to a modified Mediterranean style diet for three months. Dietary records, blood fatty acid levels, prostate specific antigen, C-reactive protein and DNA damage were assessed pre- and post-intervention. DNA damage was inversely correlated with dietary adherence (p = 0.013) and whole blood monounsaturated fatty acids (p = 0.009) and oleic acid (p = 0.020). DNA damage was positively correlated with the intake of dairy products (p = 0.043), red meat (p = 0.007) and whole blood omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (p = 0.015). Both the source and type of dietary fat changed significantly over the course of the dietary intervention. Levels of DNA damage were correlated with various dietary fat sources and types of dietary fat. View Full-Text
Keywords: DNA damage; Mediterranean style diet; fatty acids; prostate cancer DNA damage; Mediterranean style diet; fatty acids; prostate cancer
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Bishop, K.S.; Erdrich, S.; Karunasinghe, N.; Han, D.Y.; Zhu, S.; Jesuthasan, A.; Ferguson, L.R. An Investigation into the Association between DNA Damage and Dietary Fatty Acid in Men with Prostate Cancer. Nutrients 2015, 7, 405-422.

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