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Diet-Microbiota Interactions and Their Implications for Healthy Living

by Ian B. Jeffery 1,2,* and Paul W. O'Toole 1,2
1
Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, College Road, Cork, Ireland
2
Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, College Road, Cork, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2013, 5(1), 234-252; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu5010234
Received: 7 December 2012 / Revised: 10 January 2013 / Accepted: 10 January 2013 / Published: 17 January 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microbiota and Gut Function)
It is well established that diet influences the health of an individual and that a diet rich in plant-based foods has many advantages in relation to the health and well-being of an individual. What has been unclear until recently is the large contribution of the gut microbiota to this effect. As well as providing basic nutritional requirements, the long-term diet of an animal modifies its gut microbiota. In adults, diets that have a high proportion of fruit and vegetables and a low consumption of meat are associated with a highly diverse microbiota and are defined by a greater abundance of Prevotella compared to Bacteroides, while the reverse is associated with a diet that contains a low proportion of plant-based foods. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly clear that the effect of the microbial ecology of the gut goes beyond the local gut immune system and is implicated in immune-related disorders, such as IBS, diabetes and inflamm-ageing. In this review, we investigate the evidence that a balanced diet leads to a balanced, diverse microbiota with significant consequences for healthy ageing by focusing on conditions of interest. View Full-Text
Keywords: microbial; diversity; IBS; ageing; diet; microbiota; microbiome; SCFA; vitamins microbial; diversity; IBS; ageing; diet; microbiota; microbiome; SCFA; vitamins
MDPI and ACS Style

Jeffery, I.B.; O'Toole, P.W. Diet-Microbiota Interactions and Their Implications for Healthy Living. Nutrients 2013, 5, 234-252.

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