Next Article in Journal
Role of Chrononutrition in the Antihypertensive Effects of Natural Bioactive Compounds
Next Article in Special Issue
Change in the Healthiness of Foods Sold in an Australian Supermarket Chain Following Implementation of a Shelf Tag Intervention Based on the Health Star Rating System
Previous Article in Journal
Personalized Nutrition in the Management of Female Infertility: New Insights on Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Diet and Risk of Gastric Cancer: An Umbrella Review
 
 
Article

Cost–Benefit and Cost–Utility Analyses to Demonstrate the Potential Value-for-Money of Supermarket Shelf Tags Promoting Healthier Packaged Products in Australia

1
Deakin Health Economics, School of Health and Social Development, Institute for Health Transformation, Deakin University, Geelong 3220, Australia
2
Global Obesity Centre, School of Health and Social Development, Institute for Health Transformation, Deakin University, Geelong 3220, Australia
3
Biostatistics Unit, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong 3220, Australia
4
City of Greater Bendigo Council, Bendigo 3550, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Elizabeth Holliday
Nutrients 2022, 14(9), 1919; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14091919
Received: 5 April 2022 / Revised: 28 April 2022 / Accepted: 29 April 2022 / Published: 3 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Introduction to Causal Inference Methods in Nutritional Research)
The supermarket environment impacts the healthiness of food purchased and consumed. Shelf tags that alert customers to healthier packaged products can improve the healthiness of overall purchases. This study assessed the potential value-for-money of implementing a three-year shelf tag intervention across all major supermarket chains in Australia. Cost–benefit analyses (CBA) and cost–utility analyses (CUA) were conducted based on results of a 12-week non-randomised controlled trial of a shelf tag intervention in seven Australian supermarkets. The change in energy density of all packaged foods purchased during the trial was used to estimate population-level changes in mean daily energy intake. A multi-state, multiple-cohort Markov model estimated the subsequent obesity-related health and healthcare cost outcomes over the lifetime of the 2019 Australian population. The CBA and CUA took societal and healthcare sector perspectives, respectively. The intervention was estimated to produce a mean reduction in population body weight of 1.09 kg. The net present value of the intervention was approximately AUD 17 billion (B). Over 98% of the intervention costs were borne by supermarkets. CUA findings were consistent with the CBA—the intervention was dominant, producing both health benefits and cost-savings. Shelf tags are likely to offer excellent value-for-money from societal and healthcare sector perspectives. View Full-Text
Keywords: cost–benefit analysis; cost–utility analysis; supermarket; healthy retail; shelf tag; economic evaluation cost–benefit analysis; cost–utility analysis; supermarket; healthy retail; shelf tag; economic evaluation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ananthapavan, J.; Sacks, G.; Orellana, L.; Marshall, J.; Robinson, E.; Moodie, M.; Blake, M.; Brown, A.; Carter, R.; Cameron, A.J. Cost–Benefit and Cost–Utility Analyses to Demonstrate the Potential Value-for-Money of Supermarket Shelf Tags Promoting Healthier Packaged Products in Australia. Nutrients 2022, 14, 1919. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14091919

AMA Style

Ananthapavan J, Sacks G, Orellana L, Marshall J, Robinson E, Moodie M, Blake M, Brown A, Carter R, Cameron AJ. Cost–Benefit and Cost–Utility Analyses to Demonstrate the Potential Value-for-Money of Supermarket Shelf Tags Promoting Healthier Packaged Products in Australia. Nutrients. 2022; 14(9):1919. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14091919

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ananthapavan, Jaithri, Gary Sacks, Liliana Orellana, Josephine Marshall, Ella Robinson, Marj Moodie, Miranda Blake, Amy Brown, Rob Carter, and Adrian J. Cameron. 2022. "Cost–Benefit and Cost–Utility Analyses to Demonstrate the Potential Value-for-Money of Supermarket Shelf Tags Promoting Healthier Packaged Products in Australia" Nutrients 14, no. 9: 1919. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14091919

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop