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Article

The Dietary Supplement Creatyl-l-Leucine Does Not Bioaccumulate in Muscle, Brain or Plasma and Is Not a Significant Bioavailable Source of Creatine

Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Basic Medical Sciences Building, 745 Bannatyne Avenue, Winnipeg, MB R3E 0J9, Canada
Academic Editors: Richard B. Kreider and Jeffrey R. Stout
Nutrients 2022, 14(3), 701; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030701
Received: 18 January 2022 / Revised: 3 February 2022 / Accepted: 4 February 2022 / Published: 8 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Creatine Supplementation for Health and Clinical Diseases)
Creatine is an important energy metabolite that is concentrated in tissues such as the muscles and brain. Creatine is reversibly converted to creatine phosphate through a reaction with ATP or ADP, which is catalyzed by the enzyme creatine kinase. Dietary supplementation with relatively large amounts of creatine monohydrate has been proven as an effective sports supplement that can enhances athletic performance during acute high-energy demand physical activity. Some side effects have been reported with creatine monohydrate supplementation, which have stimulated research into new potential molecules that could be used as supplements to potentially provide bioavailable creatine. Recently, a popular supplement, creatyl-l-leucine, has been proposed as a potential dietary ingredient that may potentially provide bioavailable creatine. This study tests whether creatyl-l-leucine is a bioavailable compound and determines whether it can furnish creatine as a dietary supplement. Rats were deprived of dietary creatine for a period of two weeks and then given one of three treatments: a control AIN-93G creatine-free diet, AIN-93G supplemented with creatine monohydrate or AIN-93G with an equimolar amount of creatyl-l-leucine supplement in the diet for one week. When compared to the control and the creatine monohydrate-supplemented diet, creatyl-l-leucine supplementation resulted in no bioaccumulation of either creatyl-l-leucine or creatine in tissue. View Full-Text
Keywords: creatine; amino acids; dietary supplement creatine; amino acids; dietary supplement
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MDPI and ACS Style

da Silva, R.P. The Dietary Supplement Creatyl-l-Leucine Does Not Bioaccumulate in Muscle, Brain or Plasma and Is Not a Significant Bioavailable Source of Creatine. Nutrients 2022, 14, 701. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030701

AMA Style

da Silva RP. The Dietary Supplement Creatyl-l-Leucine Does Not Bioaccumulate in Muscle, Brain or Plasma and Is Not a Significant Bioavailable Source of Creatine. Nutrients. 2022; 14(3):701. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030701

Chicago/Turabian Style

da Silva, Robin P. 2022. "The Dietary Supplement Creatyl-l-Leucine Does Not Bioaccumulate in Muscle, Brain or Plasma and Is Not a Significant Bioavailable Source of Creatine" Nutrients 14, no. 3: 701. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030701

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