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Lactiplantibacillus plantarum dfa1 Outperforms Enterococcus faecium dfa1 on Anti-Obesity in High Fat-Induced Obesity Mice Possibly through the Differences in Gut Dysbiosis Attenuation, despite the Similar Anti-Inflammatory Properties

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Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
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Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
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Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok 10110, Thailand
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Department of Biology, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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Research Management and Development Division, Office of the President, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand
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Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
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Microbiome Research Unit for Probiotics in Food and Cosmetics, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
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Department of Clinical Sciences and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand
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Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
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Translational Research in Inflammation and Immunology Research Unit (TRIRU), Department of Microbiology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
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Nephrology Unit, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Leyuan Li, Malgorzata Muc-Wierzgon and Sandra Martin-Pelaez
Nutrients 2022, 14(1), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010080
Received: 27 November 2021 / Revised: 20 December 2021 / Accepted: 22 December 2021 / Published: 25 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Topic Probiotics, Prebiotics and Postbiotics in Human Health)
Fat reduction and anti-inflammation are commonly claimed properties of probiotics. Lactiplantibacillus plantarum and Enterococcus faecium were tested in high fat-induced obesity mice and in vitro experiments. After 16 weeks of probiotics, L. plantarum dfa1 outperforms E. faecium dfa1 on the anti-obesity property as indicated by body weight, regional fat accumulation, serum cholesterol, inflammatory cytokines (in blood and colon tissue), and gut barrier defect (FITC-dextran assay). With fecal microbiome analysis, L. plantarum dfa1 but not E. faecium dfa1 reduced fecal abundance of pathogenic Proteobacteria without an alteration in total Gram-negative bacteria when compared with non-probiotics obese mice. With palmitic acid induction, the condition media from both probiotics similarly attenuated supernatant IL-8, improved enterocyte integrity and down-regulated cholesterol absorption-associated genes in Caco-2 cell (an enterocyte cell line) and reduced supernatant cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) with normalization of cell energy status (extracellular flux analysis) in bone-marrow-derived macrophages. Due to the anti-inflammatory effect of the condition media of both probiotics on palmitic acid-activated enterocytes was neutralized by amylase, the active anti-inflammatory molecules might, partly, be exopolysaccharides. As L. plantarum dfa1 out-performed E. faecium dfa1 in anti-obesity property, possibly through the reduced fecal Proteobacteria, with a similar anti-inflammatory exopolysaccharide; L. plantarum is a potentially better option for anti-obesity than E. faecium. View Full-Text
Keywords: probiotics; dysbiosis; obesity; high fat diet; Lactiplantibacillus plantarum; Enterococcus faecium; Lactobacillus plantarum probiotics; dysbiosis; obesity; high fat diet; Lactiplantibacillus plantarum; Enterococcus faecium; Lactobacillus plantarum
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ondee, T.; Pongpirul, K.; Janchot, K.; Kanacharoen, S.; Lertmongkolaksorn, T.; Wongsaroj, L.; Somboonna, N.; Ngamwongsatit, N.; Leelahavanichkul, A. Lactiplantibacillus plantarum dfa1 Outperforms Enterococcus faecium dfa1 on Anti-Obesity in High Fat-Induced Obesity Mice Possibly through the Differences in Gut Dysbiosis Attenuation, despite the Similar Anti-Inflammatory Properties. Nutrients 2022, 14, 80. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010080

AMA Style

Ondee T, Pongpirul K, Janchot K, Kanacharoen S, Lertmongkolaksorn T, Wongsaroj L, Somboonna N, Ngamwongsatit N, Leelahavanichkul A. Lactiplantibacillus plantarum dfa1 Outperforms Enterococcus faecium dfa1 on Anti-Obesity in High Fat-Induced Obesity Mice Possibly through the Differences in Gut Dysbiosis Attenuation, despite the Similar Anti-Inflammatory Properties. Nutrients. 2022; 14(1):80. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010080

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ondee, Thunnicha, Krit Pongpirul, Kantima Janchot, Suthicha Kanacharoen, Thanapat Lertmongkolaksorn, Lampet Wongsaroj, Naraporn Somboonna, Natharin Ngamwongsatit, and Asada Leelahavanichkul. 2022. "Lactiplantibacillus plantarum dfa1 Outperforms Enterococcus faecium dfa1 on Anti-Obesity in High Fat-Induced Obesity Mice Possibly through the Differences in Gut Dysbiosis Attenuation, despite the Similar Anti-Inflammatory Properties" Nutrients 14, no. 1: 80. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010080

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