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Article

The Relationship between Gut Microbiome and Cognition in Older Australians

1
Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122, Australia
2
Health and Biosecurity, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
3
Precision Health Future Science Platform, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Kathrin Cohen Kadosh and Krzysztof Czaja
Nutrients 2022, 14(1), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010064
Received: 15 November 2021 / Revised: 20 December 2021 / Accepted: 22 December 2021 / Published: 24 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microbiota and Cognitive Function)
Ageing is associated with changes in biological processes, including reductions in cognitive functions and gut microbiome diversity. However, not much is known about the relationship between cognition and the microbiome with increasing age. Therefore, we examined the relationship between the gut microbiome and cognition in 69 healthy participants aged 60–75 years. The gut microbiome was analysed with the 16S rRNA sequencing method. The cognitive assessment included the Cognitive Drug Research computerised assessment battery, which produced five cognitive factors corresponding to ‘Quality of Episodic Secondary Memory’, ‘Quality of Working Memory’, ‘Continuity of Attention, ‘Speed of Memory’ and ‘Power of Concentration’. Multiple linear regression showed that the bacterial family Carnobacteriaceae explained 9% of the variance in predicting Quality of Episodic Secondary Memory. Alcaligenaceae and Clostridiaceae explained 15% of the variance in predicting Quality of Working Memory; Bacteroidaceae, Barnesiellaceae, Rikenellaceae and Gemellaceae explained 11% of the variance in Power of Concentration. The present study provides specific evidence of a relationship between specific families of bacteria and different domains of cognition. View Full-Text
Keywords: gut microbiome; cognition; gut–brain axis; ageing gut microbiome; cognition; gut–brain axis; ageing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Komanduri, M.; Savage, K.; Lea, A.; McPhee, G.; Nolidin, K.; Deleuil, S.; Stough, C.; Gondalia, S. The Relationship between Gut Microbiome and Cognition in Older Australians. Nutrients 2022, 14, 64. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010064

AMA Style

Komanduri M, Savage K, Lea A, McPhee G, Nolidin K, Deleuil S, Stough C, Gondalia S. The Relationship between Gut Microbiome and Cognition in Older Australians. Nutrients. 2022; 14(1):64. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010064

Chicago/Turabian Style

Komanduri, Mrudhula, Karen Savage, Ana Lea, Grace McPhee, Karen Nolidin, Saurenne Deleuil, Con Stough, and Shakuntla Gondalia. 2022. "The Relationship between Gut Microbiome and Cognition in Older Australians" Nutrients 14, no. 1: 64. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010064

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