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Article

Mango Consumption Is Associated with Improved Nutrient Intakes, Diet Quality, and Weight-Related Health Outcomes

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Nutritional Strategies, 59 Marriott Place, Paris, ON N3L 0A3, Canada
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Nutrition Impact, 9725 D Drive North, Battle Creek, MI 49014, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Gary Wil-liamson
Nutrients 2022, 14(1), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010059
Received: 21 November 2021 / Revised: 15 December 2021 / Accepted: 16 December 2021 / Published: 24 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
As nutrient-dense fruits, mangoes are commonly consumed globally and are important sources of nutrients in the diet. Nonetheless, mangoes remain relatively under-consumed in the United States. The objective of the present analysis was to examine nutrient intakes, diet quality, and health outcomes using data from NHANES 2001–2018 in children and adult mango consumers (n = 291; adults n = 449) compared with mango non-consumers (children n = 28,257; adults n = 44,574). Daily energy and nutrient intakes were adjusted for a complex sample design of NHANES using appropriate weights. Mango consumption was not associated with daily energy intake, compared with non-consumption, in both children and adults. Children consuming mangoes had a significantly lower daily intake of added sugar, sodium, total fat, and a higher intake of dietary fiber, magnesium, potassium, total choline, vitamin C, and vitamin D, compared with non-consumers. In adults, mango consumers had significantly higher daily intakes of dietary fiber, magnesium, potassium, folate, vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin E and significantly lower intakes of added sugar and cholesterol, compared with non-consumers. Mango consumption was also associated with a better diet quality vs. mango non-consumers (p < 0.0001). Mango consumption in adolescents was associated with lower BMI z-scores, compared with non-consumption. In adults, BMI scores, waist circumference, and body weight were significantly lower only in male mango consumers when compared with mango non-consumers. The current results support that mango consumption is associated with improved nutrient intakes, diet quality, and certain health outcomes. Thus, dietary strategies that aim to increase mango consumption in the American population should be evaluated as part of future dietary guidance. View Full-Text
Keywords: NHANES; mango; nutrients; diet quality; weight-related health outcomes NHANES; mango; nutrients; diet quality; weight-related health outcomes
MDPI and ACS Style

Papanikolaou, Y.; Fulgoni, V.L., III. Mango Consumption Is Associated with Improved Nutrient Intakes, Diet Quality, and Weight-Related Health Outcomes. Nutrients 2022, 14, 59. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010059

AMA Style

Papanikolaou Y, Fulgoni VL III. Mango Consumption Is Associated with Improved Nutrient Intakes, Diet Quality, and Weight-Related Health Outcomes. Nutrients. 2022; 14(1):59. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010059

Chicago/Turabian Style

Papanikolaou, Yanni, and Victor L. Fulgoni III. 2022. "Mango Consumption Is Associated with Improved Nutrient Intakes, Diet Quality, and Weight-Related Health Outcomes" Nutrients 14, no. 1: 59. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010059

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