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Article

Acceptability of Plant-Based Diets for People with Chronic Kidney Disease: Perspectives of Renal Dietitians

1
School of Medicine, Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health, University of Wollongong, Northfields Ave, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
2
Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Peter Pribis
Nutrients 2022, 14(1), 216; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010216
Received: 17 December 2021 / Revised: 24 December 2021 / Accepted: 1 January 2022 / Published: 4 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Diets: Working towards a Sustainable Future)
The purpose of this study was to explore the perspective of renal dietitians regarding plant-based diets for chronic kidney disease (CKD) management and evaluate the acceptability of a hypothetical plant-based dietary prescription aiming for the consumption of 30 unique plant foods per week. This study used an exploratory mixed methods design. Forty-six renal dietitians participated in either an online survey (n = 35) or an in-depth interview (n = 11). Dietitians perceived that plant-based diets could address multiple clinical concerns relevant to CKD. Forty percent of survey respondents reported the hypothetical dietary prescription was realistic for people with CKD, 34.3% were unsure, and 25.7% perceived it as unrealistic. Strengths of the hypothetical prescription included shifting the focus to whole foods and using practical resources like recipes. Limited staffing, time, and follow-up opportunities with patients, as well as differing nutrition philosophies were the most commonly reported challenges to implementation; while a supportive multidisciplinary team was identified as an important enabler. To increase patient acceptance of plant-based dietary approaches, education about plant food benefits was recommended, as was implementing small, incremental dietary changes. Successful implementation of plant-based diets is perceived to require frequent patient contact and ongoing education and support by a dietitian. Buy-in from the multidisciplinary team was also considered imperative. View Full-Text
Keywords: plant-based diets; chronic kidney disease; implementation; barriers; enablers; cross-sectional survey; qualitative research plant-based diets; chronic kidney disease; implementation; barriers; enablers; cross-sectional survey; qualitative research
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MDPI and ACS Style

Stanford, J.; Zuck, M.; Stefoska-Needham, A.; Charlton, K.; Lambert, K. Acceptability of Plant-Based Diets for People with Chronic Kidney Disease: Perspectives of Renal Dietitians. Nutrients 2022, 14, 216. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010216

AMA Style

Stanford J, Zuck M, Stefoska-Needham A, Charlton K, Lambert K. Acceptability of Plant-Based Diets for People with Chronic Kidney Disease: Perspectives of Renal Dietitians. Nutrients. 2022; 14(1):216. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010216

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stanford, Jordan, Mikaela Zuck, Anita Stefoska-Needham, Karen Charlton, and Kelly Lambert. 2022. "Acceptability of Plant-Based Diets for People with Chronic Kidney Disease: Perspectives of Renal Dietitians" Nutrients 14, no. 1: 216. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010216

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