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Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of Diet for a Reduction in the Severity of the Disease

by 1 and 2,3,4,*
1
Department of Interdisciplinary Research, College of Allied Health Sciences, Augusta University, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
2
Department of Undergraduate Health Professionals, College of Allied Health Sciences, Augusta University, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
3
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
4
Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Augusta University, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Omorogieva Ojo, Amanda Adegboye and Pietro Manuel Ferraro
Nutrients 2021, 13(9), 3277; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093277
Received: 10 August 2021 / Revised: 13 September 2021 / Accepted: 17 September 2021 / Published: 19 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition in Chronic Conditions)
Chronic kidney disease affects ~37 million adults in the US, and it is often undiagnosed due to a lack of apparent symptoms in early stages. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) interferes with the body’s physiological and biological mechanisms, such as fluid electrolyte and pH balance, blood pressure regulation, excretion of toxins and waste, vitamin D metabolism, and hormonal regulation. Many CKD patients are at risk of hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia, chronic metabolic acidosis, bone deterioration, blood pressure abnormalities, and edema. These risks may be minimized, and the disease’s progression may be slowed through careful monitoring of protein, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and calcium, relieving symptoms experienced by CKD patients. In this review, the current Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) recommendations are highlighted, reflecting the 2020 update, including explanations for the pathophysiology behind the recommendations. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, the Mediterranean diet, and the whole foods plant-based diet are currently being examined for their potential role in delaying CKD progression. Biological explanations for why the whole foods plant-based diet may benefit CKD patients compared to diets that include animal products are examined. Strong evidence continues to support the importance of diet meeting the daily requirement in the prevention and progression of kidney disease, and medical nutrition therapy with a registered dietitian is a critical aspect in medical intervention for CKD. View Full-Text
Keywords: diabetes; chronic kidney disease; proteinuria; diabetes; inflammation; diet; nutrition; plant-based foods; medical nutrition therapy diabetes; chronic kidney disease; proteinuria; diabetes; inflammation; diet; nutrition; plant-based foods; medical nutrition therapy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Naber, T.; Purohit, S. Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of Diet for a Reduction in the Severity of the Disease. Nutrients 2021, 13, 3277. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093277

AMA Style

Naber T, Purohit S. Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of Diet for a Reduction in the Severity of the Disease. Nutrients. 2021; 13(9):3277. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093277

Chicago/Turabian Style

Naber, Tania, and Sharad Purohit. 2021. "Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of Diet for a Reduction in the Severity of the Disease" Nutrients 13, no. 9: 3277. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093277

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