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Article

Infants’ First Solid Foods: Impact on Gut Microbiota Development in Two Intercontinental Cohorts

1
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada
2
Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
3
Centre for Metabolism, Obesity and Diabetes Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
4
Department of Medical Microbiology, School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism (NUTRIM), Maastricht University, 6229 ER Maastricht, The Netherlands
5
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
6
McMaster Midwifery Research Centre, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
7
Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
8
Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
9
Population Health Research Institute, Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation, Hamilton, ON L8L 2X2, Canada
10
Department of Epidemiology, Care and Public Health Research Institute (CAPHRI), Maastricht University, 6229 ER Maastricht, The Netherlands
11
InVivo Planetary Health: An Affiliate of the World Universities Network (WUN), West New York, NJ 10704, USA
12
Department of Medical Microbiology, Care and Public Health Research Institute (CAPHRI), Maastricht University Medical Centre, 6229 ER Maastricht, The Netherlands
13
Institute of Medical Microbiology, RWTH University Hospital Aachen, RWTH University, 52074 Aachen, Germany
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contribute equally to this work.
Academic Editors: Eva Untersmayr and Peter M. Abuja
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2639; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082639
Received: 12 July 2021 / Revised: 28 July 2021 / Accepted: 29 July 2021 / Published: 30 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Connection between Microbiome, Lifestyle and Diet)
The introduction of solid foods is an important dietary event during infancy that causes profound shifts in the gut microbial composition towards a more adult-like state. Infant gut bacterial dynamics, especially in relation to nutritional intake remain understudied. Over 2 weeks surrounding the time of solid food introduction, the day-to-day dynamics in the gut microbiomes of 24 healthy, full-term infants from the Baby, Food & Mi and LucKi-Gut cohort studies were investigated in relation to their dietary intake. Microbial richness (observed species) and diversity (Shannon index) increased over time and were positively associated with dietary diversity. Microbial community structure (Bray–Curtis dissimilarity) was determined predominantly by individual and age (days). The extent of change in community structure in the introductory period was negatively associated with daily dietary diversity. High daily dietary diversity stabilized the gut microbiome. Bifidobacterial taxa were positively associated, while taxa of the genus Veillonella, that may be the same species, were negatively associated with dietary diversity in both cohorts. This study furthers our understanding of the impact of solid food introduction on gut microbiome development in early life. Dietary diversity seems to have the greatest impact on the gut microbiome as solids are introduced. View Full-Text
Keywords: infant gut microbiome; microbial diversity; dietary diversity; 16S rRNA; infant nutrition; complementary foods; introduction to solids; gut community infant gut microbiome; microbial diversity; dietary diversity; 16S rRNA; infant nutrition; complementary foods; introduction to solids; gut community
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MDPI and ACS Style

Homann, C.-M.; Rossel, C.A.J.; Dizzell, S.; Bervoets, L.; Simioni, J.; Li, J.; Gunn, E.; Surette, M.G.; de Souza, R.J.; Mommers, M.; Hutton, E.K.; Morrison, K.M.; Penders, J.; van Best, N.; Stearns, J.C. Infants’ First Solid Foods: Impact on Gut Microbiota Development in Two Intercontinental Cohorts. Nutrients 2021, 13, 2639. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082639

AMA Style

Homann C-M, Rossel CAJ, Dizzell S, Bervoets L, Simioni J, Li J, Gunn E, Surette MG, de Souza RJ, Mommers M, Hutton EK, Morrison KM, Penders J, van Best N, Stearns JC. Infants’ First Solid Foods: Impact on Gut Microbiota Development in Two Intercontinental Cohorts. Nutrients. 2021; 13(8):2639. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082639

Chicago/Turabian Style

Homann, Chiara-Maria, Connor A.J. Rossel, Sara Dizzell, Liene Bervoets, Julia Simioni, Jenifer Li, Elizabeth Gunn, Michael G. Surette, Russell J. de Souza, Monique Mommers, Eileen K. Hutton, Katherine M. Morrison, John Penders, Niels van Best, and Jennifer C. Stearns 2021. "Infants’ First Solid Foods: Impact on Gut Microbiota Development in Two Intercontinental Cohorts" Nutrients 13, no. 8: 2639. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082639

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