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Article

Effects of a Diet Based on Foods from Symbiotic Agriculture on the Gut Microbiota of Subjects at Risk for Metabolic Syndrome

1
Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, via Belmeloro, 6, 40126 Bologna, Italy
2
Biostatistics and Clinical Trial Unit, Istituto Romagnolo per lo Studio dei Tumori “Dino Amadori”—IRST S.r.l., IRCCS, via P. Maroncelli, 40, 47014 Meldola, Italy
3
Branch of Medical Statistics, Biometry, and Epidemiology “G.A. Maccacaro”, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, via A. Vanzetti, 5, 20133 Milano, Italy
4
Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences and Technologies, University of Salento, via Province of Lecce—Monteroni, 73100 Lecce, Italy
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Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, via Massarenti, 9, 40138 Bologna, Italy
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Donna Impresa Coldiretti Forlì-Cesena e Rimini, via E. Forlanini, 11, 47121 Forli, Italy
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Centro Colture Sperimentali, CCS Aosta S.r.l., Frazione Olleyes 9, 11020 Quart, Italy
8
Department of Medical Oncology, Istituto Romagnolo per lo Studio dei Tumori “Dino Amadori”—IRST S.r.l., IRCCS, via P. Maroncelli, 40, 47014 Meldola, Italy
9
Bioscience Laboratory, Istituto Romagnolo per lo Studio dei Tumori “Dino Amadori”—IRST S.r.l., IRCCS, via P. Maroncelli, 40, 47014 Meldola, Italy
10
Immunotherapy, Cell Therapy and Biobank Unit, Istituto Romagnolo per lo Studio dei Tumori “Dino Amadori”—IRST S.r.l., IRCCS, via P. Maroncelli, 40, 47014 Meldola, Italy
11
Department of Agricultural, Food, Environmental and Animal Sciences, Università di Udine, via delle Scienze 206, 33100 Udine, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Both authors contributed equally to this work.
This paper is dedicated to the memory of Prof. Dino Amadori, founder of our institute (Istituto Romagnolo per lo Studio dei Tumori “Dino Amadori”—IRST S.r.l., IRCCS), who devoted his life to the study and treatment of cancer.
Academic Editor: Panagiota Mitrou
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 2081; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062081
Received: 25 May 2021 / Accepted: 14 June 2021 / Published: 17 June 2021
Diet is a major driver of gut microbiota variation and plays a role in metabolic disorders, including metabolic syndrome (MS). Mycorrhized foods from symbiotic agriculture (SA) exhibit improved nutritional properties, but potential benefits have never been investigated in humans. We conducted a pilot interventional study on 60 adults with ≥ 1 risk factors for MS, of whom 33 consumed SA-derived fresh foods and 27 received probiotics over 30 days, with a 15-day follow-up. Stool, urine and blood were collected over time to explore changes in gut microbiota, metabolome, and biochemical, inflammatory and immunologic parameters; previous dietary habits were investigated through a validated food-frequency questionnaire. The baseline microbiota showed alterations typical of metabolic disorders, mainly an increase in Coriobacteriaceae and a decrease in health-associated taxa, which were partly reversed after the SA-based diet. Improvements were observed in metabolome, MS presence (two out of six subjects no longer had MS) or components. Changes were more pronounced with less healthy baseline diets. Probiotics had a marginal, not entirely favorable, effect, although one out of three subjects no longer suffered from MS. These findings suggest that improved dietary patterns can modulate the host microbiota and metabolome, counteracting the risk of developing MS. View Full-Text
Keywords: adult volunteers; dietary intervention; dietary patterns; gut microbiota; pilot study; symbiotic agriculture; metabolic dysfunction; metabolic syndrome; metabolome adult volunteers; dietary intervention; dietary patterns; gut microbiota; pilot study; symbiotic agriculture; metabolic dysfunction; metabolic syndrome; metabolome
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MDPI and ACS Style

Turroni, S.; Petracci, E.; Edefonti, V.; Giudetti, A.M.; D’Amico, F.; Paganelli, L.; Giovannetti, G.; Del Coco, L.; Fanizzi, F.P.; Rampelli, S.; Guerra, D.; Rengucci, C.; Bulgarelli, J.; Tazzari, M.; Pellegrini, N.; Ferraroni, M.; Nanni, O.; Serra, P. Effects of a Diet Based on Foods from Symbiotic Agriculture on the Gut Microbiota of Subjects at Risk for Metabolic Syndrome. Nutrients 2021, 13, 2081. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062081

AMA Style

Turroni S, Petracci E, Edefonti V, Giudetti AM, D’Amico F, Paganelli L, Giovannetti G, Del Coco L, Fanizzi FP, Rampelli S, Guerra D, Rengucci C, Bulgarelli J, Tazzari M, Pellegrini N, Ferraroni M, Nanni O, Serra P. Effects of a Diet Based on Foods from Symbiotic Agriculture on the Gut Microbiota of Subjects at Risk for Metabolic Syndrome. Nutrients. 2021; 13(6):2081. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062081

Chicago/Turabian Style

Turroni, Silvia, Elisabetta Petracci, Valeria Edefonti, Anna M. Giudetti, Federica D’Amico, Lisa Paganelli, Giusto Giovannetti, Laura Del Coco, Francesco P. Fanizzi, Simone Rampelli, Debora Guerra, Claudia Rengucci, Jenny Bulgarelli, Marcella Tazzari, Nicoletta Pellegrini, Monica Ferraroni, Oriana Nanni, and Patrizia Serra. 2021. "Effects of a Diet Based on Foods from Symbiotic Agriculture on the Gut Microbiota of Subjects at Risk for Metabolic Syndrome" Nutrients 13, no. 6: 2081. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062081

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