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Article

Acacia Gum Is Well Tolerated While Increasing Satiety and Lowering Peak Blood Glucose Response in Healthy Human Subjects

1
Food Science and Nutrition Department, University of Minnesota, 1334 Eckles Ave, Falcon Heights, MN 55108, USA
2
Clinical and Translational Science Institute, University of Minnesota, 717 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Daniel Lamport
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 618; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020618
Received: 18 December 2020 / Revised: 8 February 2021 / Accepted: 8 February 2021 / Published: 14 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Carbohydrate and Human Health)
Acacia gum (AG) is a non-viscous soluble fiber that is easily incorporated into beverages and foods. To determine its physiological effects in healthy human subjects, we fed 0, 20, and 40 g of acacia gum in orange juice along with a bagel and cream cheese after a 12 h fast and compared satiety, glycemic response, gastrointestinal tolerance, and food intake among treatments. Subjects (n = 48) reported less hunger and greater fullness at 15 min (p = 0.019 and 0.003, respectively) and 240 min (p = 0.036 and 0.05, respectively) after breakfast with the 40 g fiber treatment. They also reported being more satisfied at 15 min (p = 0.011) and less hungry with the 40 g fiber treatment at 30 min (p = 0.012). Subjects reported more bloating, flatulence, and GI rumbling on the 40 g fiber treatment compared to control, although values for GI tolerance were all low with AG treatment. No significant differences were found in area under the curve (AUC) or change from baseline for blood glucose response, although actual blood glucose with 20 g fiber at 30 min was significantly less than control. Individuals varied greatly in their postprandial glucose response to all treatments. AG improves satiety response and may lower peak glucose response at certain timepoints, and it is well tolerated in healthy human subjects. AG can be added to beverages and foods in doses that can help meet fiber recommendations. View Full-Text
Keywords: gum acacia; gum arabic; satiety response; food intake regulation; dietary fiber; blood glucose; postprandial period; randomized controlled trial; crossover trials; healthy subjects gum acacia; gum arabic; satiety response; food intake regulation; dietary fiber; blood glucose; postprandial period; randomized controlled trial; crossover trials; healthy subjects
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MDPI and ACS Style

Larson, R.; Nelson, C.; Korczak, R.; Willis, H.; Erickson, J.; Wang, Q.; Slavin, J. Acacia Gum Is Well Tolerated While Increasing Satiety and Lowering Peak Blood Glucose Response in Healthy Human Subjects. Nutrients 2021, 13, 618. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020618

AMA Style

Larson R, Nelson C, Korczak R, Willis H, Erickson J, Wang Q, Slavin J. Acacia Gum Is Well Tolerated While Increasing Satiety and Lowering Peak Blood Glucose Response in Healthy Human Subjects. Nutrients. 2021; 13(2):618. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020618

Chicago/Turabian Style

Larson, Riley, Courtney Nelson, Renee Korczak, Holly Willis, Jennifer Erickson, Qi Wang, and Joanne Slavin. 2021. "Acacia Gum Is Well Tolerated While Increasing Satiety and Lowering Peak Blood Glucose Response in Healthy Human Subjects" Nutrients 13, no. 2: 618. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020618

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