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Comment published on 28 April 2022, see Nutrients 2022, 14(9), 1836.
Article

The Short-Term Effects and Tolerability of Low-Viscosity Soluble Fibre on Gastroparesis Patients: A Pilot Clinical Intervention Study

by 1,2, 1,2,* and 1,2,3
1
School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, NSW 2560, Australia
2
Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders Unit, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, NSW 2560, Australia
3
University Medical Clinic of Camden & Campbelltown (UMCCC), Campbelltown, NSW 2560, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Iain A. Brownlee and Ina Bergheim
Nutrients 2021, 13(12), 4298; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124298
Received: 24 October 2021 / Revised: 22 November 2021 / Accepted: 26 November 2021 / Published: 28 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Clinical Nutrition)
Gastroparesis is a motility disorder that causes severe gastric symptoms and delayed gastric emptying, where the majority of sufferers are females (80%), with 29% of sufferers also diagnosed with Type-1 or Type-2 diabetes. Current clinical recommendations involve stringent dietary restriction and includes the avoidance and minimization of dietary fibre. Dietary fibre lowers the glycaemic index of food, reduces inflammation and provides laxation. Lack of dietary fibre in the diet can affect long-term gastrointestinal health. Our previously published rheological study demonstrated that “low-viscosity” soluble fibres could be a potentially tolerable source of fibre for the gastroparetic population. A randomised controlled crossover pilot clinical study was designed to compare Partially-hydrolysed guar gum or PHGG (test fibre 1), gum Arabic (test fibre 2), psyllium husk (positive control) and water (negative control) in mild-to-moderate symptomatic gastroparesis patients (requiring no enteral tube feeding). The principal aim of the study was to determine the short-term physiological effects and tolerability of the test fibres. In n = 10 female participants, post-prandial blood glucose, gastroparesis symptoms, and breath test measurements were recorded. Normalized clinical data revealed that test fibres PHGG and gum Arabic were able to regulate blood glucose comparable to psyllium husk, while causing far fewer symptoms, equivalent to negative control. The test fibres did not greatly delay mouth-to-caecum transit, though more data is needed. The study data looks promising, and a longer-term study investigating these test fibres is being planned. View Full-Text
Keywords: soluble fibre; gastroparesis; motility disorder; ANMS GCSI-DD; glucose regulation soluble fibre; gastroparesis; motility disorder; ANMS GCSI-DD; glucose regulation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Suresh, H.; Zhou, J.; Ho, V. The Short-Term Effects and Tolerability of Low-Viscosity Soluble Fibre on Gastroparesis Patients: A Pilot Clinical Intervention Study. Nutrients 2021, 13, 4298. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124298

AMA Style

Suresh H, Zhou J, Ho V. The Short-Term Effects and Tolerability of Low-Viscosity Soluble Fibre on Gastroparesis Patients: A Pilot Clinical Intervention Study. Nutrients. 2021; 13(12):4298. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124298

Chicago/Turabian Style

Suresh, Harsha, Jerry Zhou, and Vincent Ho. 2021. "The Short-Term Effects and Tolerability of Low-Viscosity Soluble Fibre on Gastroparesis Patients: A Pilot Clinical Intervention Study" Nutrients 13, no. 12: 4298. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124298

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